BMC Bioinformatics

The latest research articles published by BMC Bioinformatics
  • SubPatCNV: approximate subspace pattern mining for mapping copy-number variations
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: Many DNA copy-number variations (CNVs) are known to lead to phenotypic variations and pathogenesis. While CNVs are often only common in a small number of samples in the studied population or patient cohort, previous work has not focused on customized identification of CNV regions that only exhibit in subsets of samples with advanced data mining techniques to reliably answer questions such as ?Which are all the chromosomal fragments showing nearly identical deletions or insertions in more than 30% of the individuals??. Results: We introduce a tool for mining CNV subspace patterns, namely SubPatCNV, which is capable of identifying all aberrant CNV regions specific to arbitrary sample subsets larger than a support threshold. By design, SubPatCNV is the implementation of a variation of approximate association pattern mining algorithm under a spatial constraint on the positional CNV probe features. In benchmark test, SubPatCNV was applied to identify population specific germline CNVs from four populations of HapMap samples. In experiments on the TCGA ovarian cancer dataset, SubPatCNV discovered many large aberrant CNV events in patient subgroups, and reported regions enriched with cancer relevant genes. In both HapMap data and TCGA data, it was observed that SubPatCNV employs approximate pattern mining to more effectively identify CNV subspace patterns that are consistent within a subgroup from high-density array data. Conclusions: SubPatCNV available through http://sourceforge.net/projects/subpatcnv/is a unique scalable open-source software tool that provides the flexibility of identifying CNV regions specific to sample subgroups of different sizes from high-density CNV array data.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Semi-supervised adaptive-height snipping of the hierarchical clustering tree
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: In genomics, hierarchical clustering (HC) is a popular method for grouping similar samples based on a distance measure. HC algorithms do not actually create clusters, but compute a hierarchical representation of the data set. Usually, a fixed height on the HC tree is used, and each contiguous branch of samples below that height is considered a separate cluster. Due to the fixed-height cutting, those clusters may not unravel significant functional coherence hidden deeper in the tree. Besides that, most existing approaches do not make use of available clinical information to guide cluster extraction from the HC. Thus, the identified subgroups may be difficult to interpret in relation to that information. Results: We develop a novel framework for decomposing the HC tree into clusters by semi-supervised piecewise snipping. The framework, called guided piecewise snipping, utilizes both molecular data and clinical information to decompose the HC tree into clusters. It cuts the given HC tree at variable heights to find a partition (a set of non-overlapping clusters) which does not only represent a structure deemed to underlie the data from which HC tree is derived, but is also maximally consistent with the supplied clinical data. Moreover, the approach does not require the user to specify the number of clusters prior to the analysis. Extensive results on simulated and multiple medical data sets show that our approach consistently produces more meaningful clusters than the standard fixed-height cut and/or non-guided approaches. Conclusions: The guided piecewise snipping approach features several novelties and advantages over existing approaches. The proposed algorithm is generic, and can be combined with other algorithms that operate on detected clusters. This approach represents an advancement in several regards: (1) a piecewise tree snipping framework that efficiently extracts clusters by snipping the HC tree possibly at variable heights while preserving the HC tree structure; (2) a flexible implementation allowing a variety of data types for both building and snipping the HC tree, including patient follow-up data like survival as auxiliary information.The data sets and R code are provided as supplementary files. The proposed method is available from Bioconductor as the R-package HCsnip.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Decomposing the space of protein quaternary structures with the interface fragment pair library
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: The physical interactions between proteins constitute the basis of protein quaternary structures. They dominate many biological processes in living cells. Deciphering the structural features of interacting proteins is essential to understand their cellular functions. Similar to the space of protein tertiary structures in which discrete patterns are clearly observed on fold or sub-fold motif levels, it has been found that the space of protein quaternary structures is highly degenerate due to the packing of compact secondary structure elements at interfaces. Therefore, it is necessary to further decompose the protein quaternary structural space into a more local representation. Results: Here we constructed an interface fragment pair library from the current structure database of protein complexes. After structural-based clustering, we found that more than 90% of these interface fragment pairs can be represented by a limited number of highly abundant motifs. These motifs were further used to guide complex assembly. A large-scale benchmark test shows that the native-like binding is highly likely in the structural ensemble of modeled protein complexes that were built through the library. Conclusions: Our study therefore presents supportive evidences that the space of protein quaternary structures can be represented by the combination of a small set of secondary-structure-based packing at binding interfaces. Finally, after future improvements such as adding sequence profiles, we expect this new library will be useful to predict structures of unknown protein-protein interactions.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Rational selection of experimental readout and intervention sites for reducing uncertainties in computational model predictions
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: Understanding the dynamics of biological processes can substantially be supported by computational models in the form of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODE). Typically, this model class contains many unknown parameters, which are estimated from inadequate and noisy data. Depending on the ODE structure, predictions based on unmeasured states and associated parameters are highly uncertain, even undetermined. For given data, profile likelihood analysis has been proven to be one of the most practically relevant approaches for analyzing the identifiability of an ODE structure, and thus model predictions. In case of highly uncertain or non-identifiable parameters, rational experimental design based on various approaches has shown to significantly reduce parameter uncertainties with minimal amount of effort. Results: In this work we illustrate how to use profile likelihood samples for quantifying the individual contribution of parameter uncertainty to prediction uncertainty. For the uncertainty quantification we introduce the profile likelihood sensitivity (PLS) index. Additionally, for the case of several uncertain parameters, we introduce the PLS entropy to quantify individual contributions to the overall prediction uncertainty. We show how to use these two criteria as an experimental design objective for selecting new, informative readouts in combination with intervention site identification. The characteristics of the proposed multi-criterion objective are illustrated with an in silico example. We further illustrate how an existing practically non-identifiable model for the chlorophyll fluorescence induction in a photosynthetic organism, D. salina, can be rendered identifiable by additional experiments with new readouts. Conclusions: Having data and profile likelihood samples at hand, the here proposed uncertainty quantification based on prediction samples from the profile likelihood provides a simple way for determining individual contributions of parameter uncertainties to uncertainties in model predictions. The uncertainty quantification of specific model predictions allows identifying regions, where model predictions have to be considered with care. Such uncertain regions can be used for a rational experimental design to render initially highly uncertain model predictions into certainty. Finally, our uncertainty quantification directly accounts for parameter interdependencies and parameter sensitivities of the specific prediction.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Amyloid precursor protein interaction network in human testis: sentinel proteins for male reproduction
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is widely recognized for playing a central role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Although APP is expressed in several tissues outside the human central nervous system, the functions of APP and its family members in other tissues are still poorly understood. APP is involved in several biological functions which might be potentially important for male fertility, such as cell adhesion, cell motility, signaling, and apoptosis. Furthermore, APP superfamily members are known to be associated with fertility. Knowledge on the protein networks of APP in human testis and spermatozoa will shed light on the function of APP in the male reproductive system. Results: We performed a Yeast Two-Hybrid screen and a database search to study the interaction network of APP in human testis and sperm. To gain insights into the role of APP superfamily members in fertility, the study was extended to APP-like protein 2 (APLP2). We analyzed several topological properties of the APP interaction network and the biological and physiological properties of the proteins in the APP interaction network were also specified by gene ontologyand pathways analyses. We classified significant features related to the human male reproduction for the APP interacting proteins and identified modules of proteins with similar functional roles which may show cooperative behavior for male fertility. Conclusions: The present work provides the first report on the APP interactome in human testis. Our approach allowed the identification of novel interactions and recognition of key APP interacting proteins for male reproduction, particularly in sperm-oocyte interaction.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Nonparametric Bayesian clustering to detect bipolar methylated genomic loci
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: With recent development in sequencing technology, a large number of genome-wide DNA methylation studies have generated massive amounts of bisulfite sequencing data. The analysis of DNA methylation patterns helps researchers understand epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. Highly variable methylation patterns reflect stochastic fluctuations in DNA methylation, whereas well-structured methylation patterns imply deterministic methylation events. Among these methylation patterns, bipolar patterns are important as they may originate from allele-specific methylation (ASM) or cell-specific methylation (CSM). Results: Utilizing nonparametric Bayesian clustering followed by hypothesis testing, we have developed a novel statistical approach to identify bipolar methylated genomic regions in bisulfite sequencing data. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed method achieves good performance in terms of specificity and sensitivity. We used the method to analyze data from mouse brain and human blood methylomes. The bipolar methylated segments detected are found highly consistent with the differentially methylated regions identified by using purified cell subsets. Conclusions: Bipolar DNA methylation often indicates epigenetic heterogeneity caused by ASM or CSM. With allele-specific events filtered out or appropriately taken into account, our proposed approach sheds light on the identification of cell-specific genes/pathways under strong epigenetic control in a heterogeneous cell population.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • YersiniaBase: a genomic resource and analysis platform for comparative analysis of Yersinia
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: Yersinia is a Gram-negative bacteria that includes serious pathogens such as the Yersinia pestis, which causing plague, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Yersinia enterocolitica. The remaining species are generally considered non-pathogenic to humans, although there is evidence that at least some of these species can cause occasional infections using distinct mechanisms from the more pathogenic species. With the advances in sequencing technologies, many genomes of Yersinia have been sequenced. However, there is currently no specialized platform to hold the rapidly-growing Yersinia genomic data and to provide analysis tools particularly for comparative analyses, which are required to provide improved insights into their biology, evolution and pathogenicity.DescriptionTo facilitate the ongoing and future research of Yersinia, especially those generally considered non-pathogenic species, a well-defined repository and analysis platform is needed to hold the Yersinia genomic data and analysis tools for the Yersinia research community. Hence, we have developed the YersiniaBase, a robust and user-friendly Yersinia resource and analysis platform for the analysis of Yersinia genomic data. YersiniaBase has a total of twelve species and 232 genome sequences, of which the majority are Yersinia pestis. In order to smooth the process of searching genomic data in a large database, we implemented an Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)-based real-time searching system in YersiniaBase. Besides incorporating existing tools, which include JavaScript-based genome browser (JBrowse) and Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), YersiniaBase also has in-house developed tools: (1) Pairwise Genome Comparison tool (PGC) for comparing two user-selected genomes; (2) Pathogenomics Profiling Tool (PathoProT) for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Yersinia genomes; (3) YersiniaTree for constructing phylogenetic tree of Yersinia. We ran analyses based on the tools and genomic data in YersiniaBase and the preliminary results showed differences in virulence genes found in Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis compared to other Yersinia species, and differences between Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. enterocolitica and Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica. Conclusions: YersiniaBase offers free access to wide range of genomic data and analysis tools for the analysis of Yersinia. YersiniaBase can be access at http://yersinia.um.edu.my.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Single-molecule dataset (SMD): a generalized storage format for raw and processed single-molecule data
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: Single-molecule techniques have emerged as incisive approaches for addressing a wide range of questions arising in contemporary biological research [ 1-4]. The analysis and interpretation of raw single-molecule data benefits greatly from the ongoing development of sophisticated statistical analysis tools that enable accurate inference at the low signal-to-noise ratios frequently associated with these measurements. While a number of groups have released analysis toolkits as open source software [5-14], it remains difficult to compare analysis for experiments performed in different labs due to a lack of standardization. Results: Here we propose a standardized single-molecule dataset (SMD) file format. SMD is designed to accommodate a wide variety of computer programming languages, single-molecule techniques, and analysis strategies. To facilitate adoption of this format we have made two existing data analysis packages that are used for single-molecule analysis compatible with this format. Conclusion: Adoption of a common, standard data file format for sharing raw single-molecule data and analysis outcomes is a critical step for the emerging and powerful single-molecule field, which will benefit both sophisticated users and non-specialists by allowing standardized, transparent, and reproducible analysis practices.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Fast and robust group-wise eQTL mapping using sparse graphical models
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: Genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have emerged as a powerful tool to understand the genetic basis of gene expression and complex traits. The traditional eQTL methods focus on testing the associations between individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene expression traits. A major drawback of this approach is that it cannot model the joint effect of a set of SNPs on a set of genes, which may correspond to hidden biological pathways. Results: We introduce a new approach to identify novel group-wise associations between sets of SNPs and sets of genes. Such associations are captured by hidden variables connecting SNPs and genes. Our model is a linear-Gaussian model and uses two types of hidden variables. One captures the set associations between SNPs and genes, and the other captures confounders. We develop an efficient optimization procedure which makes this approach suitable for large scale studies. Extensive experimental evaluations on both simulated and real datasets demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively capture both individual and group-wise signals that cannot be identified by the state-of-the-art eQTL mapping methods. Conclusions: Considering group-wise associations significantly improves the accuracy of eQTL mapping, and the successful multi-layer regression model opens a new approach to understand how multiple SNPs interact with each other to jointly affect the expression level of a group of genes.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Predicting protein functions using incomplete hierarchical labels
    [Jan 2015]

    Background: Protein function prediction is to assign biological or biochemical functions to proteins, and it is a challenging computational problem characterized by several factors: (1) the number of function labels (annotations) is large; (2) a protein may be associated with multiple labels; (3) the function labels are structured in a hierarchy; and (4) the labels are incomplete. Current predictive models often assume that the labels of the labeled proteins are complete, i.e. no label is missing. But in real scenarios, we may be aware of only some hierarchical labels of a protein, and we may not know whether additional ones are actually present. The scenario of incomplete hierarchical labels, a challenging and practical problem, is seldom studied in protein function prediction. Results: In this paper, we propose an algorithm to Predict protein functions using Incomplete hierarchical LabeLs (PILL in short). PILL takes into account the hierarchical and the flat taxonomy similarity between function labels, and defines a Combined Similarity (ComSim) to measure the correlation between labels. PILL estimates the missing labels for a protein based on ComSim and the known labels of the protein, and uses a regularization to exploit the interactions between proteins for function prediction. PILL is shown to outperform other related techniques in replenishing the missing labels and in predicting the functions of completely unlabeled proteins on publicly available PPI datasets annotated with MIPS Functional Catalogue and Gene Ontology labels. Conclusion: The empirical study shows that it is important to consider the incomplete annotation for protein function prediction. The proposed method (PILL) can serve as a valuable tool for protein function prediction using incomplete labels. The Matlab code of PILL is available upon request.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Predicting breast cancer using an expression values weighted clinical classifier
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Clinical data, such as patient history, laboratory analysis, ultrasound parameters-which are the basis of day-to-day clinical decision support-are often used to guide the clinical management of cancer in the presence of microarray data. Several data fusion techniques are available to integrate genomics or proteomics data, but only a few studies have created a single prediction model using both gene expression and clinical data. These studies often remain inconclusive regarding an obtained improvement in prediction performance. To improve clinical management, these data should be fully exploited. This requires efficient algorithms to integrate these data sets and design a final classifier.LS-SVM classifiers and generalized eigenvalue/singular value decompositions are successfully used in many bioinformatics applications for prediction tasks. While bringing up the benefits of these two techniques, we propose a machine learning approach, a weighted LS-SVM classifier to integrate two data sources: microarray and clinical parameters. Results: We compared and evaluated the proposed methods on five breast cancer case studies. Compared to LS-SVM classifier on individual data sets, generalized eigenvalue decomposition (GEVD) and kernel GEVD, the proposed weighted LS-SVM classifier offers good prediction performance, in terms of test area under ROC Curve (AUC), on all breast cancer case studies. Conclusions: Thus a clinical classifier weighted with microarray data set results in significantly improved diagnosis, prognosis and prediction responses to therapy. The proposed model has been shown as a promising mathematical framework in both data fusion and non-linear classification problems.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • ExpaRNA-P: simultaneous exact pattern matching and folding of RNAs
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Identifying sequence-structure motifs common to two RNAs can speed up the comparison of structural RNAs substantially. The core algorithm of the existent approach ExpaRNA solves this problem for a priori known input structures. However, such structures are rarely known; moreover, predicting them computationally is no rescue, since single sequence structure prediction is highly unreliable. Results: The novel algorithm ExpaRNA-P computes exactly matching sequence-structure motifs in entire Boltzmann-distributed structure ensembles of two RNAs; thereby we match and fold RNAs simultaneously, analogous to the well-known ?simultaneous alignment and folding? of RNAs. While this implies much higher flexibility compared to ExpaRNA, ExpaRNA-P has the same very low complexity (quadratic in time and space), which is enabled by its novel structure ensemble-based sparsification. Furthermore, we devise a generalized chaining algorithm to compute compatible subsets of ExpaRNA-P?s sequence-structure motifs. Resulting in the very fast RNA alignment approach ExpLoc-P, we utilize the best chain as anchor constraints for the sequence-structure alignment tool LocARNA. ExpLoc-P is benchmarked in several variants and versus state-of-the-art approaches. In particular, we formally introduce and evaluate strict and relaxed variants of the problem; the latter makes the approach sensitive to compensatory mutations. Across a benchmark set of typical non-coding RNAs, ExpLoc-P has similar accuracy to LocARNA but is four times faster (in both variants), while it achieves a speed-up over 30-fold for the longest benchmark sequences (?400nt). Finally, different ExpLoc-P variants enable tailoring of the method to specific application scenarios. ExpaRNA-P and ExpLoc-P are distributed as part of the LocARNA package. The source code is freely available at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/ExpaRNA-P. Conclusions: ExpaRNA-P?s novel ensemble-based sparsification reduces its complexity to quadratic time and space. Thereby, ExpaRNA-P significantly speeds up sequence-structure alignment while maintaining the alignment quality. Different ExpaRNA-P variants support a wide range of applications.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • APP: an Automated Proteomics Pipeline for the analysis of mass spectrometry data based on multiple open access tools
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Mass spectrometry analyses of complex protein samples yield large amounts of data and specific expertise is needed for data analysis, in addition to a dedicated computer infrastructure. Furthermore, the identification of proteins and their specific properties require the use of multiple independent bioinformatics tools and several database search algorithms to process the same datasets. In order to facilitate and increase the speed of data analysis, there is a need for an integrated platform that would allow a comprehensive profiling of thousands of peptides and proteins in a single process through the simultaneous exploitation of multiple complementary algorithms. Results: We have established a new proteomics pipeline designated as APP that fulfills these objectives using a complete series of tools freely available from open sources. APP automates the processing of proteomics tasks such as peptide identification, validation and quantitation from LC-MS/MS data and allows easy integration of many separate proteomics tools. Distributed processing is at the core of APP, allowing the processing of very large datasets using any combination of Windows/Linux physical or virtual computing resources. Conclusions: APP provides distributed computing nodes that are simple to set up, greatly relieving the need for separate IT competence when handling large datasets. The modular nature of APP allows complex workflows to be managed and distributed, speeding up throughput and setup. Additionally, APP logs execution information on all executed tasks and generated results, simplifying information management and validation.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Identifying tandem Ankyrin repeats in protein structures
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Tandem repetition of structural motifs in proteins is frequently observed across all forms of life. The topology of the repeating unit and its frequency of occurrence are associated to a wide range of structural and functional roles in diverse proteins, and defects in repeat proteins have been associated with a number of diseases. It is thus desirable to accurately identify the specific repeat type and its copy number. Weak evolutionary constraints on the repeat units and insertions/deletions between them make their identification difficult at the sequence level and structure based approaches are desired. Methods based on periodicity of a signal are affected by insertions/deletions and structure-structure alignment methods are computationally intensive. Thus computationally efficient and effective structure-based approach is desired. The proposed graph theoretic approach based on spectral analysis of protein structure represented as a graph is presented for the identification of one of the most frequently observed structural repeats in proteins, Ankyrin repeat. Results: It has been shown in a large number of studies that the 3-dimensional topology of a protein structure is well captured by a graph, making it possible to analyze a complex protein structure as a mathematical entity. In this study we show that the eigen spectra profile of a protein structure graph exhibits a unique repetitive profile for contiguous repeating units enabling the detection of the repeat region and the repeat type. On employing the secondary structure architecture of repeat motifs in known repeat proteins, the prediction accuracy is enhanced. The proposed approach uses a non-redundant set of 58 Ankyrin proteins to define rules for the detection of Ankyrin repeat motifs. The proposed method is evaluated on a set of 370 proteins comprising 125 known Ankyrin proteins and remaining non-solenoid proteins and the prediction compared with UniProt annotation, a sequence-based approach, RADAR, and a structure-based approach, ConSole. To show the efficacy of the approach, we analyzed the complete PDB structural database and identified 641 previously unrecognized Ankyrin repeat proteins. The proposed approach can be easily extended to detect other repeat types as we observe a unique eigen spectra profile for different repeat types. This is shown by considering representative examples from four protein repeat families, viz., Tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR), Armadillo repeat (ARM), Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and Kelch repeat. The method has been implemented as a web server, called AnkPred. It is freely available at `bioinf.iiit.ac.in/AnkPred?. Conclusions: AnkPred provides an elegant and computationally efficient graph-based approach for detecting Ankyrin structural repeats in proteins. By analyzing the eigen spectra of the protein structure graph and secondary structure information, characteristic features of a known repeat family are identified with very good accuracy. This method is especially useful in correctly identifying new members of a repeat family. We also show that a number of proteins exhibit multi-repeat architecture that may necessitate the functional analysis of those proteins.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • FogBank: a single cell segmentation across multiple cell lines and image modalities
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Many cell lines currently used in medical research, such as cancer cells or stem cells, grow in confluent sheets or colonies. The biology of individual cells provide valuable information, thus the separation of touching cells in these microscopy images is critical for counting, identification and measurement of individual cells. Over-segmentation of single cells continues to be a major problem for methods based on morphological watershed due to the high level of noise in microscopy cell images. There is a need for a new segmentation method that is robust over a wide variety of biological images and can accurately separate individual cells even in challenging datasets such as confluent sheets or colonies. Results: We present a new automated segmentation method called FogBank that accurately separates cells when confluent and touching each other. This technique is successfully applied to phase contrast, bright field, fluorescence microscopy and binary images. The method is based on morphological watershed principles with two new features to improve accuracy and minimize over-segmentation.First, FogBank uses histogram binning to quantize pixel intensities which minimizes the image noise that causes over-segmentation. Second, FogBank uses a geodesic distance mask derived from raw images to detect the shapes of individual cells, in contrast to the more linear cell edges that other watershed-like algorithms produce.We evaluated the segmentation accuracy against manually segmented datasets using two metrics. FogBank achieved segmentation accuracy on the order of 0.75 (1 being a perfect match). We compared our method with other available segmentation techniques in term of achieved performance over the reference data sets. FogBank outperformed all related algorithms. The accuracy has also been visually verified on data sets with 14 cell lines across 3 imaging modalities leading to 876 segmentation evaluation images. Conclusions: FogBank produces single cell segmentation from confluent cell sheets with high accuracy. It can be applied to microscopy images of multiple cell lines and a variety of imaging modalities. The code for the segmentation method is available as open-source and includes a Graphical User Interface for user friendly execution.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • WEBnm@ v2.0: Web server and services for comparing protein flexibility
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Normal mode analysis (NMA) using elastic network models is a reliable and cost-effective computational method to characterise protein flexibility and by extension, their dynamics. Further insight into the dynamics?function relationship can be gained by comparing protein motions between protein homologs and functional classifications. This can be achieved by comparing normal modes obtained from sets of evolutionary related proteins. Results: We have developed an automated tool for comparative NMA of a set of pre-aligned protein structures. The user can submit a sequence alignment in the FASTA format and the corresponding coordinate files in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) format. The computed normalised squared atomic fluctuations and atomic deformation energies of the submitted structures can be easily compared on graphs provided by the web user interface. The web server provides pairwise comparison of the dynamics of all proteins included in the submitted set using two measures: the Root Mean Squared Inner Product and the Bhattacharyya Coefficient. The Comparative Analysis has been implemented on our web server for NMA, WEBnm@, which also provides recently upgraded functionality for NMA of single protein structures. This includes new visualisations of protein motion, visualisation of inter-residue correlations and the analysis of conformational change using the overlap analysis. In addition, programmatic access to WEBnm@ is now available through a SOAP-based web service. Webnm@ is available at http://apps.cbu.uib.no/webnma. Conclusion: WEBnm@ v2.0 is an online tool offering unique capability for comparative NMA on multiple protein structures. Along with a convenient web interface, powerful computing resources, and several methods for mode analyses, WEBnm@ facilitates the assessment of protein flexibility within protein families and superfamilies. These analyses can give a good view of how the structures move and how the flexibility is conserved over the different structures.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • A framework for feature extraction from hospital medical data with applications in risk prediction
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Feature engineering is a time consuming component of predictive modelling. We propose a versatile platform to automatically extract features for risk prediction, based on a pre-defined and extensible entity schema. The extraction is independent of disease type or risk prediction task. We contrast auto-extracted features to baselines generated from the Elixhauser comorbidities. Results: Hospital medical records was transformed to event sequences, to which filters were applied to extract feature sets capturing diversity in temporal scales and data types. The features were evaluated on a readmission prediction task, comparing with baseline feature sets generated from the Elixhauser comorbidities. The prediction model was through logistic regression with elastic net regularization. Predictions horizons of 1, 2, 3, 6, 12?months were considered for four diverse diseases: diabetes, COPD, mental disorders and pneumonia, with derivation and validation cohorts defined on non-overlapping data-collection periods.For unplanned readmissions, auto-extracted feature set using socio-demographic information and medical records, outperformed baselines derived from the socio-demographic information and Elixhauser comorbidities, over 20 settings (5 prediction horizons over 4 diseases). In particular over 30-day prediction, the AUCs are: COPD?baseline: 0.60 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.63), auto-extracted: 0.67 (0.64, 0.70); diabetes?baseline: 0.60 (0.58, 0.63), auto-extracted: 0.67 (0.64, 0.69); mental disorders?baseline: 0.57 (0.54, 0.60), auto-extracted: 0.69 (0.64,0.70); pneumonia?baseline: 0.61 (0.59, 0.63), auto-extracted: 0.70 (0.67, 0.72). Conclusions: The advantages of auto-extracted standard features from complex medical records, in a disease and task agnostic manner were demonstrated. Auto-extracted features have good predictive power over multiple time horizons. Such feature sets have potential to form the foundation of complex automated analytic tasks.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Prediction of plant pre-microRNAs and their microRNAs in genome-scale sequences using structure-sequence features and support vector machine
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of non-coding RNAs approximately 21 nucleotides in length that play pivotal roles at the post-transcriptional level in animals, plants and viruses. These molecules silence their target genes by degrading transcription or suppressing translation. Studies have shown that miRNAs are involved in biological responses to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of these molecules and their targets can aid the understanding of regulatory processes. Recently, prediction methods based on machine learning have been widely used for miRNA prediction. However, most of these methods were designed for mammalian miRNA prediction, and few are available for predicting miRNAs in the pre-miRNAs of specific plant species. Although the complete Solanum lycopersicum genome has been published, only 77 Solanum lycopersicum miRNAs have been identified, far less than the estimated number. Therefore, it is essential to develop a prediction method based on machine learning to identify new plant miRNAs. Results: A novel classification model based on a support vector machine (SVM) was trained to identify real and pseudo plant pre-miRNAs together with their miRNAs. An initial set of 152 novel features related to sequential structures was used to train the model. By applying feature selection, we obtained the best subset of 47 features for use with the Back Support Vector Machine-Recursive Feature Elimination (B-SVM-RFE) method for the classification of plant pre-miRNAs. Using this method, 63 features were obtained for plant miRNA classification. We then developed an integrated classification model, miPlantPreMat, which comprises MiPlantPre and MiPlantMat, to identify plant pre-miRNAs and their miRNAs. This model achieved approximately 90% accuracy using plant datasets from nine plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Oryza sativa, Physcomitrella patens, Medicago truncatula, Sorghum bicolor, Arabidopsis lyrata, Zea mays and Solanum lycopersicum. Using miPlantPreMat, 522 Solanum lycopersicum miRNAs were identified in the Solanum lycopersicum genome sequence. Conclusions: We developed an integrated classification model, miPlantPreMat, based on structure-sequence features and SVM. MiPlantPreMat was used to identify both plant pre-miRNAs and the corresponding mature miRNAs. An improved feature selection method was proposed, resulting in high classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • An integrated network visualization framework towards metabolic engineering applications
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Over the last years, several methods for the phenotype simulation of microorganisms, under specified genetic and environmental conditions have been proposed, in the context of Metabolic Engineering (ME). These methods provided insight on the functioning of microbial metabolism and played a key role in the design of genetic modifications that can lead to strains of industrial interest. On the other hand, in the context of Systems Biology research, biological network visualization has reinforced its role as a core tool in understanding biological processes. However, it has been scarcely used to foster ME related methods, in spite of the acknowledged potential. Results: In this work, an open-source software that aims to fill the gap between ME and metabolic network visualization is proposed, in the form of a plugin to the OptFlux ME platform. The framework is based on an abstract layer, where the network is represented as a bipartite graph containing minimal information about the underlying entities and their desired relative placement. The framework provides input/output support for networks specified in standard formats, such as XGMML, SBGN or SBML, providing a connection to genome-scale metabolic models. An user-interface makes it possible to edit, manipulate and query nodes in the network, providing tools to visualize diverse effects, including visual filters and aspect changing (e.g. colors, shapes and sizes). These tools are particularly interesting for ME, since they allow overlaying phenotype simulation results or elementary flux modes over the networks. Conclusions: The framework and its source code are freely available, together with documentation and other resources, being illustrated with well documented case studies.
    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Identifying target processes for microbial electrosynthesis by elementary mode analysis
    [Dec 2014]

    Background: Microbial electrosynthesis and electro fermentation are techniques that aim to optimize microbial production of chemicals and fuels by regulating the cellular redox balance via interaction with electrodes. While the concept is known for decades major knowledge gaps remain, which make it hard to evaluate its biotechnological potential. Here we present an in silico approach to identify beneficial production processes for electro fermentation by elementary mode analysis. Since the fundamentals of electron transport between electrodes and microbes have not been fully uncovered yet, we propose different options and discuss their impact on biomass and product yields. Results: For the first time 20 different valuable products were screened for their potential to show increased yields during anaerobic electrically enhanced fermentation. Surprisingly we found that an increase in product formation by electrical enhancement is not necessarily dependent on the degree of reduction of the product but rather the metabolic pathway it is derived from. We present a variety of beneficial processes with product yield increases of maximal 36% in reductive and 84% in oxidative fermentations and final theoretical product yields up to 100%. This includes compounds that are already produced at industrial scale such as succinic acid, lysine and diaminopentane as well as potential novel bio-commodities such as isoprene, para-hydroxybenzoic acid and para-aminobenzoic acid. Furthermore, it is shown that the way of electron transport has major impact on achievable biomass and product yields. The coupling of electron transport to energy conservation could be identified as crucial for most processes. Conclusions: This study introduces a powerful tool to determine beneficial substrate and product combinations for electro-fermentation. It also highlights that the maximal yield achievable by bio electrochemical techniques depends strongly on the actual electron transport mechanisms. Therefore it is of great importance to reveal the involved fundamental processes to be able to optimize and advance electro fermentations beyond the level of lab-scale studies.
    Categories: Journal Articles