Nucleic Acids Research

Nucleic Acids Research - RSS feed of current issue
  • LncRNA2Target: a database for differentially expressed genes after lncRNA knockdown or overexpression
    [Jan 2015]

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of genes at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, yet what genes are regulated by a specific lncRNA remains to be characterized. To assess the effects of the lncRNA on gene expression, an increasing number of researchers profiled the genome-wide or individual gene expression level change after knocking down or overexpressing the lncRNA. Herein, we describe a curated database named LncRNA2Target, which stores lncRNA-to-target genes and is publicly accessible at http://www.lncrna2target.org. A gene was considered as a target of a lncRNA if it is differentially expressed after the lncRNA knockdown or overexpression. LncRNA2Target provides a web interface through which its users can search for the targets of a particular lncRNA or for the lncRNAs that target a particular gene. Both search types are performed either by browsing a provided catalog of lncRNA names or by inserting lncRNA/target gene IDs/names in a search box.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • MeT-DB: a database of transcriptome methylation in mammalian cells
    [Jan 2015]

    Methyltranscriptome is an exciting new area that studies the mechanisms and functions of methylation in transcripts. The MethylTranscriptome DataBase (MeT-DB, http://compgenomics.utsa.edu/methylation/) is the first comprehensive resource for N6-methyladenosine (m6A) in mammalian transcriptome. It includes a database that records publicaly available data sets from methylated RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeRIP-Seq), a recently developed technology for interrogating m6A methyltranscriptome. MeT-DB includes ~300k m6A methylation sites in 74 MeRIP-Seq samples from 22 different experimental conditions predicted by exomePeak and MACS2 algorithms. To explore this rich information, MeT-DB also provides a genome browser to query and visualize context-specific m6A methylation under different conditions. MeT-DB also includes the binding site data of microRNA, splicing factor and RNA binding proteins in the browser window for comparison with m6A sites and for exploring the potential functions of m6A. Analysis of differential m6A methylation and the related differential gene expression under two conditions is also available in the browser. A global perspective of the genome-wide distribution of m6A methylation in all the data is provided in circular ideograms, which also act as a navigation portal. The query results and the entire data set can be exported to assist publication and additional analysis.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • UniProt: a hub for protein information
    [Jan 2015]

    UniProt is an important collection of protein sequences and their annotations, which has doubled in size to 80 million sequences during the past year. This growth in sequences has prompted an extension of UniProt accession number space from 6 to 10 characters. An increasing fraction of new sequences are identical to a sequence that already exists in the database with the majority of sequences coming from genome sequencing projects. We have created a new proteome identifier that uniquely identifies a particular assembly of a species and strain or subspecies to help users track the provenance of sequences. We present a new website that has been designed using a user-experience design process. We have introduced an annotation score for all entries in UniProt to represent the relative amount of knowledge known about each protein. These scores will be helpful in identifying which proteins are the best characterized and most informative for comparative analysis. All UniProt data is provided freely and is available on the web at http://www.uniprot.org/.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The InterPro protein families database: the classification resource after 15 years
    [Jan 2015]

    The InterPro database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/) is a freely available resource that can be used to classify sequences into protein families and to predict the presence of important domains and sites. Central to the InterPro database are predictive models, known as signatures, from a range of different protein family databases that have different biological focuses and use different methodological approaches to classify protein families and domains. InterPro integrates these signatures, capitalizing on the respective strengths of the individual databases, to produce a powerful protein classification resource. Here, we report on the status of InterPro as it enters its 15th year of operation, and give an overview of new developments with the database and its associated Web interfaces and software. In particular, the new domain architecture search tool is described and the process of mapping of Gene Ontology terms to InterPro is outlined. We also discuss the challenges faced by the resource given the explosive growth in sequence data in recent years. InterPro (version 48.0) contains 36 766 member database signatures integrated into 26 238 InterPro entries, an increase of over 3993 entries (5081 signatures), since 2012.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • CDD: NCBI's conserved domain database
    [Jan 2015]

    NCBI's CDD, the Conserved Domain Database, enters its 15th year as a public resource for the annotation of proteins with the location of conserved domain footprints. Going forward, we strive to improve the coverage and consistency of domain annotation provided by CDD. We maintain a live search system as well as an archive of pre-computed domain annotation for sequences tracked in NCBI's Entrez protein database, which can be retrieved for single sequences or in bulk. We also maintain import procedures so that CDD contains domain models and domain definitions provided by several collections available in the public domain, as well as those produced by an in-house curation effort. The curation effort aims at increasing coverage and providing finer-grained classifications of common protein domains, for which a wealth of functional and structural data has become available. CDD curation generates alignment models of representative sequence fragments, which are in agreement with domain boundaries as observed in protein 3D structure, and which model the structurally conserved cores of domain families as well as annotate conserved features. CDD can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The SUPERFAMILY 1.75 database in 2014: a doubling of data
    [Jan 2015]

    We present updates to the SUPERFAMILY 1.75 (http://supfam.org) online resource and protein sequence collection. The hidden Markov model library that provides sequence homology to SCOP structural domains remains unchanged at version 1.75. In the last 4 years SUPERFAMILY has more than doubled its holding of curated complete proteomes over all cellular life, from 1400 proteomes reported previously in 2010 up to 3258 at present. Outside of the main sequence collection, SUPERFAMILY continues to provide domain annotation for sequences provided by other resources such as: UniProt, Ensembl, PDB, much of JGI Phytozome and selected subcollections of NCBI RefSeq. Despite this growth in data volume, SUPERFAMILY now provides users with an expanded and daily updated phylogenetic tree of life (sTOL). This tree is built with genomic-scale domain annotation data as before, but constantly updated when new species are introduced to the sequence library. Our Gene Ontology and other functional and phenotypic annotations previously reported have stood up to critical assessment by the function prediction community. We have now introduced these data in an integrated manner online at the level of an individual sequence, and—in the case of whole genomes—with enrichment analysis against a taxonomically defined background.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • InParanoid 8: orthology analysis between 273 proteomes, mostly eukaryotic
    [Jan 2015]

    The InParanoid database (http://InParanoid.sbc.su.se) provides a user interface to orthologs inferred by the InParanoid algorithm. As there are now international efforts to curate and standardize complete proteomes, we have switched to using these resources rather than gathering and curating the proteomes ourselves. InParanoid release 8 is based on the 66 reference proteomes that the ‘Quest for Orthologs’ community has agreed on using, plus 207 additional proteomes from the UniProt complete proteomes—in total 273 species. These represent 246 eukaryotes, 20 bacteria and seven archaea. Compared to the previous release, this increases the number of species by 173% and the number of pairwise species comparisons by 650%. In turn, the number of ortholog groups has increased by 423%. We present the contents and usages of InParanoid 8, and a detailed analysis of how the proteome content has changed since the previous release.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The OMA orthology database in 2015: function predictions, better plant support, synteny view and other improvements
    [Jan 2015]

    The Orthologous Matrix (OMA) project is a method and associated database inferring evolutionary relationships amongst currently 1706 complete proteomes (i.e. the protein sequence associated for every protein-coding gene in all genomes). In this update article, we present six major new developments in OMA: (i) a new web interface; (ii) Gene Ontology function predictions as part of the OMA pipeline; (iii) better support for plant genomes and in particular homeologs in the wheat genome; (iv) a new synteny viewer providing the genomic context of orthologs; (v) statically computed hierarchical orthologous groups subsets downloadable in OrthoXML format; and (vi) possibility to export parts of the all-against-all computations and to combine them with custom data for ‘client-side’ orthology prediction. OMA can be accessed through the OMA Browser and various programmatic interfaces at http://omabrowser.org.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • OrthoDB v8: update of the hierarchical catalog of orthologs and the underlying free software
    [Jan 2015]

    Orthology, refining the concept of homology, is the cornerstone of evolutionary comparative studies. With the ever-increasing availability of genomic data, inference of orthology has become instrumental for generating hypotheses about gene functions crucial to many studies. This update of the OrthoDB hierarchical catalog of orthologs (http://www.orthodb.org) covers 3027 complete genomes, including the most comprehensive set of 87 arthropods, 61 vertebrates, 227 fungi and 2627 bacteria (sampling the most complete and representative genomes from over 11,000 available). In addition to the most extensive integration of functional annotations from UniProt, InterPro, GO, OMIM, model organism phenotypes and COG functional categories, OrthoDB uniquely provides evolutionary annotations including rates of ortholog sequence divergence, copy-number profiles, sibling groups and gene architectures. We re-designed the entirety of the OrthoDB website from the underlying technology to the user interface, enabling the user to specify species of interest and to select the relevant orthology level by the NCBI taxonomy. The text searches allow use of complex logic with various identifiers of genes, proteins, domains, ontologies or annotation keywords and phrases. Gene copy-number profiles can also be queried. This release comes with the freely available underlying ortholog clustering pipeline (http://www.orthodb.org/software).

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • SMART: recent updates, new developments and status in 2015
    [Jan 2015]

    SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool) is a web resource (http://smart.embl.de/) providing simple identification and extensive annotation of protein domains and the exploration of protein domain architectures. In the current version, SMART contains manually curated models for more than 1200 protein domains, with ~200 new models since our last update article. The underlying protein databases were synchronized with UniProt, Ensembl and STRING, bringing the total number of annotated domains and other protein features above 100 million. SMART's ‘Genomic’ mode, which annotates proteins from completely sequenced genomes was greatly expanded and now includes 2031 species, compared to 1133 in the previous release. SMART analysis results pages have been completely redesigned and include links to several new information sources. A new, vector-based display engine has been developed for protein schematics in SMART, which can also be exported as high-resolution bitmap images for easy inclusion into other documents. Taxonomic tree displays in SMART have been significantly improved, and can be easily navigated using the integrated search engine.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Expanded microbial genome coverage and improved protein family annotation in the COG database
    [Jan 2015]

    Microbial genome sequencing projects produce numerous sequences of deduced proteins, only a small fraction of which have been or will ever be studied experimentally. This leaves sequence analysis as the only feasible way to annotate these proteins and assign to them tentative functions. The Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/COG/), first created in 1997, has been a popular tool for functional annotation. Its success was largely based on (i) its reliance on complete microbial genomes, which allowed reliable assignment of orthologs and paralogs for most genes; (ii) orthology-based approach, which used the function(s) of the characterized member(s) of the protein family (COG) to assign function(s) to the entire set of carefully identified orthologs and describe the range of potential functions when there were more than one; and (iii) careful manual curation of the annotation of the COGs, aimed at detailed prediction of the biological function(s) for each COG while avoiding annotation errors and overprediction. Here we present an update of the COGs, the first since 2003, and a comprehensive revision of the COG annotations and expansion of the genome coverage to include representative complete genomes from all bacterial and archaeal lineages down to the genus level. This re-analysis of the COGs shows that the original COG assignments had an error rate below 0.5% and allows an assessment of the progress in functional genomics in the past 12 years. During this time, functions of many previously uncharacterized COGs have been elucidated and tentative functional assignments of many COGs have been validated, either by targeted experiments or through the use of high-throughput methods. A particularly important development is the assignment of functions to several widespread, conserved proteins many of which turned out to participate in translation, in particular rRNA maturation and tRNA modification. The new version of the COGs is expected to become an important tool for microbial genomics.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • MBGD update 2015: microbial genome database for flexible ortholog analysis utilizing a diverse set of genomic data
    [Jan 2015]

    The microbial genome database for comparative analysis (MBGD) (available at http://mbgd.genome.ad.jp/) is a comprehensive ortholog database for flexible comparative analysis of microbial genomes, where the users are allowed to create an ortholog table among any specified set of organisms. Because of the rapid increase in microbial genome data owing to the next-generation sequencing technology, it becomes increasingly challenging to maintain high-quality orthology relationships while allowing the users to incorporate the latest genomic data available into an analysis. Because many of the recently accumulating genomic data are draft genome sequences for which some complete genome sequences of the same or closely related species are available, MBGD now stores draft genome data and allows the users to incorporate them into a user-specific ortholog database using the MyMBGD functionality. In this function, draft genome data are incorporated into an existing ortholog table created only from the complete genome data in an incremental manner to prevent low-quality draft data from affecting clustering results. In addition, to provide high-quality orthology relationships, the standard ortholog table containing all the representative genomes, which is first created by the rapid classification program DomClust, is now refined using DomRefine, a recently developed program for improving domain-level clustering using multiple sequence alignment information.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • MoonProt: a database for proteins that are known to moonlight
    [Jan 2015]

    Moonlighting proteins comprise a class of multifunctional proteins in which a single polypeptide chain performs multiple biochemical functions that are not due to gene fusions, multiple RNA splice variants or pleiotropic effects. The known moonlighting proteins perform a variety of diverse functions in many different cell types and species, and information about their structures and functions is scattered in many publications. We have constructed the manually curated, searchable, internet-based MoonProt Database (http://www.moonlightingproteins.org) with information about the over 200 proteins that have been experimentally verified to be moonlighting proteins. The availability of this organized information provides a more complete picture of what is currently known about moonlighting proteins. The database will also aid researchers in other fields, including determining the functions of genes identified in genome sequencing projects, interpreting data from proteomics projects and annotating protein sequence and structural databases. In addition, information about the structures and functions of moonlighting proteins can be helpful in understanding how novel protein functional sites evolved on an ancient protein scaffold, which can also help in the design of proteins with novel functions.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Expediting topology data gathering for the TOPDB database
    [Jan 2015]

    The Topology Data Bank of Transmembrane Proteins (TOPDB, http://topdb.enzim.ttk.mta.hu) contains experimentally determined topology data of transmembrane proteins. Recently, we have updated TOPDB from several sources and utilized a newly developed topology prediction algorithm to determine the most reliable topology using the results of experiments as constraints. In addition to collecting the experimentally determined topology data published in the last couple of years, we gathered topographies defined by the TMDET algorithm using 3D structures from the PDBTM. Results of global topology analysis of various organisms as well as topology data generated by high throughput techniques, like the sequential positions of N- or O-glycosylations were incorporated into the TOPDB database. Moreover, a new algorithm was developed to integrate scattered topology data from various publicly available databases and a new method was introduced to measure the reliability of predicted topologies. We show that reliability values highly correlate with the per protein topology accuracy of the utilized prediction method. Altogether, more than 52 000 new topology data and more than 2600 new transmembrane proteins have been collected since the last public release of the TOPDB database.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Proteome TopFIND 3.0 with TopFINDer and PathFINDer: database and analysis tools for the association of protein termini to pre- and post-translational events
    [Jan 2015]

    The knowledgebase TopFIND is an analysis platform focussed on protein termini, their origin, modification and hence their role on protein structure and function. Here, we present a major update to TopFIND, version 3, which includes a 70% increase in the underlying data to now cover a 90 696 proteins, 165 044 N-termini, 130 182 C-termini, 14 382 cleavage sites and 33 209 substrate cleavages in H. sapiens, M. musculus, A. thaliana, S. cerevisiae and E. coli. New features include the mapping of protein termini and cleavage entries across protein isoforms and significantly, the mapping of protein termini originating from alternative transcription and alternative translation start sites. Furthermore, two analysis tools for complex data analysis based on the TopFIND resource are now available online: TopFINDer, the TopFIND ExploRer, characterizes and annotates proteomics-derived N- or C-termini sets for their origin, sequence context and implications for protein structure and function. Neo-termini are also linked to associated proteases. PathFINDer identifies indirect connections between a protease and list of substrates or termini thus supporting the evaluation of complex proteolytic processes in vivo. To demonstrate the utility of the tools, a recent N-terminomics data set of inflamed murine skin has been re-analyzed. In re-capitulating the major findings originally performed manually, this validates the utility of these new resources. The point of entry for the resource is http://clipserve.clip.ubc.ca/topfind from where the graphical interface, all application programming interfaces (API) and the analysis tools are freely accessible.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • REBASE--a database for DNA restriction and modification: enzymes, genes and genomes
    [Jan 2015]

    REBASE is a comprehensive and fully curated database of information about the components of restriction-modification (RM) systems. It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites for both restriction enzymes and methyltransferases as well as commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. All genomes that are completely sequenced are analyzed for RM system components, and with the advent of PacBio sequencing, the recognition sequences of DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are appearing rapidly. Thus, Type I and Type III systems can now be characterized in terms of recognition specificity merely by DNA sequencing. The contents of REBASE may be browsed from the web http://rebase.neb.com and selected compilations can be downloaded by FTP (ftp.neb.com). Monthly updates are also available via email.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • NrichD database: sequence databases enriched with computationally designed protein-like sequences aid in remote homology detection
    [Jan 2015]

    NrichD (http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/NRICHD/) is a database of computationally designed protein-like sequences, augmented into natural sequence databases that can perform hops in protein sequence space to assist in the detection of remote relationships. Establishing protein relationships in the absence of structural evidence or natural ‘intermediately related sequences’ is a challenging task. Recently, we have demonstrated that the computational design of artificial intermediary sequences/linkers is an effective approach to fill naturally occurring voids in protein sequence space. Through a large-scale assessment we have demonstrated that such sequences can be plugged into commonly employed search databases to improve the performance of routinely used sequence search methods in detecting remote relationships. Since it is anticipated that such data sets will be employed to establish protein relationships, two databases that have already captured these relationships at the structural and functional domain level, namely, the SCOP database and the Pfam database, have been ‘enriched’ with these artificial intermediary sequences. NrichD database currently contains 3 611 010 artificial sequences that have been generated between 27 882 pairs of families from 374 SCOP folds. The data sets are freely available for download. Additional features include the design of artificial sequences between any two protein families of interest to the user.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • KnotProt: a database of proteins with knots and slipknots
    [Jan 2015]

    The protein topology database KnotProt, http://knotprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/, collects information about protein structures with open polypeptide chains forming knots or slipknots. The knotting complexity of the cataloged proteins is presented in the form of a matrix diagram that shows users the knot type of the entire polypeptide chain and of each of its subchains. The pattern visible in the matrix gives the knotting fingerprint of a given protein and permits users to determine, for example, the minimal length of the knotted regions (knot's core size) or the depth of a knot, i.e. how many amino acids can be removed from either end of the cataloged protein structure before converting it from a knot to a different type of knot. In addition, the database presents extensive information about the biological functions, families and fold types of proteins with non-trivial knotting. As an additional feature, the KnotProt database enables users to submit protein or polymer chains and generate their knotting fingerprints.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • MobiDB 2.0: an improved database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins
    [Jan 2015]

    MobiDB (http://mobidb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins. Intrinsically disordered regions are key for the function of numerous proteins. Here we provide a new version of MobiDB, a centralized source aimed at providing the most complete picture on different flavors of disorder in protein structures covering all UniProt sequences (currently over 80 million). The database features three levels of annotation: manually curated, indirect and predicted. Manually curated data is extracted from the DisProt database. Indirect data is inferred from PDB structures that are considered an indication of intrinsic disorder. The 10 predictors currently included (three ESpritz flavors, two IUPred flavors, two DisEMBL flavors, GlobPlot, VSL2b and JRONN) enable MobiDB to provide disorder annotations for every protein in absence of more reliable data. The new version also features a consensus annotation and classification for long disordered regions. In order to complement the disorder annotations, MobiDB features additional annotations from external sources. Annotations from the UniProt database include post-translational modifications and linear motifs. Pfam annotations are displayed in graphical form and are link-enabled, allowing the user to visit the corresponding Pfam page for further information. Experimental protein–protein interactions from STRING are also classified for disorder content.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • MatrixDB, the extracellular matrix interaction database: updated content, a new navigator and expanded functionalities
    [Jan 2015]

    MatrixDB (http://matrixdb.ibcp.fr) is a freely available database focused on interactions established by extracellular proteins and polysaccharides. It is an active member of the International Molecular Exchange (IMEx) consortium and has adopted the PSI-MI standards for annotating and exchanging interaction data, either at the MIMIx or IMEx level. MatrixDB content has been updated by curation and by importing extracellular interaction data from other IMEx databases. Other major changes include the creation of a new website and the development of a novel graphical navigator, iNavigator, to build and expand interaction networks. Filters may be applied to build sub-networks based on a list of biomolecules, a specified interaction detection method and/or an expression level by tissue, developmental stage, and health state (UniGene data). Any molecule of the network may be selected and its partners added to the network at any time. Networks may be exported under Cytoscape and tabular formats and as images, and may be saved for subsequent re-use.

    Categories: Journal Articles