Nucleic Acids Research

Nucleic Acids Research - RSS feed of current issue
  • A novel approach to represent and compare RNA secondary structures
    [Jun 2014]

    Structural information is crucial in ribonucleic acid (RNA) analysis and functional annotation; nevertheless, how to include such structural data is still a debated problem. Dot-bracket notation is the most common and simple representation for RNA secondary structures but its simplicity leads also to ambiguity requiring further processing steps to dissolve. Here we present BEAR (Brand nEw Alphabet for RNA), a new context-aware structural encoding represented by a string of characters. Each character in BEAR encodes for a specific secondary structure element (loop, stem, bulge and internal loop) with specific length. Furthermore, exploiting this informative and yet simple encoding in multiple alignments of related RNAs, we captured how much structural variation is tolerated in RNA families and convert it into transition rates among secondary structure elements. This allowed us to compute a substitution matrix for secondary structure elements called MBR (Matrix of BEAR-encoded RNA secondary structures), of which we tested the ability in aligning RNA secondary structures. We propose BEAR and the MBR as powerful resources for the RNA secondary structure analysis, comparison and classification, motif finding and phylogeny.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Engineered zinc-finger transcription factors activate OCT4 (POU5F1), SOX2, KLF4, c-MYC (MYC) and miR302/367
    [Jun 2014]

    Artificial transcription factors are powerful tools for regulating gene expression. Here we report results with engineered zinc-finger transcription factors (ZF-TFs) targeting four protein-coding genes, OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, and one noncoding ribonucleic acid (RNA) gene, the microRNA (miRNA) miR302/367 cluster. We designed over 300 ZF-TFs whose targets lie within 1 kb of the transcriptional start sites (TSSs), screened them for increased messenger RNA or miRNA levels in transfected cells, and identified potent ZF-TF activators for each gene. Furthermore, we demonstrate that selected ZF-TFs function with alternative activation domains and in multiple cell lines. For OCT4, we expanded the target range to –2.5 kb and +500 bp relative to the TSS and identified additional active ZF-TFs, including three highly active ZF-TFs targeting distal enhancer, proximal enhancer and downstream from the proximal promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (FLAG-ChIP) results indicate that several inactive ZF-TFs targeting within the same regulatory region bind as well as the most active ZF-TFs, suggesting that efficient binding within one of these regulatory regions may be necessary but not sufficient for activation. These results further our understanding of ZF-TF design principles and corroborate the use of ZF-TFs targeting enhancers and downstream from the TSS for transcriptional activation.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • KDM4C (GASC1) lysine demethylase is associated with mitotic chromatin and regulates chromosome segregation during mitosis
    [Jun 2014]

    Various types of human cancers exhibit amplification or deletion of KDM4A-D members, which selectively demethylate H3K9 and H3K36, thus implicating their activity in promoting carcinogenesis. On this basis, it was hypothesized that dysregulated expression of KDM4A-D family promotes chromosomal instabilities by largely unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that unlike KDM4A-B, KDM4C is associated with chromatin during mitosis. This association is accompanied by a decrease in the mitotic levels of H3K9me3. We also show that the C-terminal region, containing the Tudor domains of KDM4C, is essential for its association with mitotic chromatin. More specifically, we show that R919 residue on the proximal Tudor domain of KDM4C is critical for its association with chromatin during mitosis. Interestingly, we demonstrate that depletion or overexpression of KDM4C, but not KDM4B, leads to over 3-fold increase in the frequency of abnormal mitotic cells showing either misaligned chromosomes at metaphase, anaphase–telophase lagging chromosomes or anaphase–telophase bridges. Furthermore, overexpression of KDM4C demethylase-dead mutant has no detectable effect on mitotic chromosome segregation. Altogether, our findings implicate KDM4C demethylase activity in regulating the fidelity of mitotic chromosome segregation by a yet unknown mechanism.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The highly expressed methionine synthase gene of Neurospora crassa is positively regulated by its proximal heterochromatic region
    [Jun 2014]

    In Neurospora crassa, the methionine synthase gene met-8 plays a key role in methionine synthesis. In this study, we found that MET-8 protein levels were compromised in several mutants defective in proper heterochromatin formation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed a 50-kb AT-rich region adjacent to the met-8 promoter. ChIP assays confirmed that trimethylated H3K9 was enriched in this region, indicating that heterochromatin may form upstream of met-8. In an H3K9R mutant strain, the output of met-8 was dramatically reduced, similar to what we observed in mutant strains that had defective heterochromatin formation. Furthermore, the production of ectopically expressed met-8 at the his-3 locus in the absence of a normal heterochromatin environment was inefficient, whereas ectopic expression of met-8 downstream of two other heterochromatin domains was efficient. In addition, our data show that the expression of mig-6 was also controlled by an upstream 4.2-kb AT-rich region similar to that of the met-8 gene, and we demonstrate that the AT-rich regions adjacent to met-8 or mig-6 are required for their peak expression. Our study indicates that met-8 and mig-6 may represent a novel type of gene, whose expression relies on the proper formation of a nearby heterochromatin region.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of Suv39H1 is involved in control of heterochromatin replication during cell cycle progression
    [Jun 2014]

    Although several studies have suggested that the functions of heterochromatin regulators may be regulated by post-translational modifications during cell cycle progression, regulation of the histone methyltransferase Suv39H1 is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate a direct link between Suv39H1 phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. We show that CDK2 phosphorylates Suv39H1 at Ser391 and these phosphorylation levels oscillate during the cell cycle, peaking at S phase and maintained during S-G2-M phase. The CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of Suv39H1 at Ser391 results in preferential dissociation from chromatin. Furthermore, phosphorylation-mediated dissociation of Suv39H1 from chromatin causes an enhanced occupancy of JMJD2A histone demethylase on heterochromatin and alterations in inactive histone marks. Overexpression of phospho-mimic Suv39H1 induces early replication of heterochromatin, suggesting the importance of Suv39H1 phosphorylation in the replication of heterochromatin. Moreover, overexpression of phospho-defective Suv39H1 caused altered replication timing of heterochromatin and increases sensitivity to replication stress. Collectively, our data suggest that phosphorylation-mediated modulation of Suv39H1-chromatin association may be an initial step in heterochromatin replication.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Impact of nuclear Piwi elimination on chromatin state in Drosophila melanogaster ovaries
    [Jun 2014]

    The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA)-interacting Piwi protein is involved in transcriptional silencing of transposable elements in ovaries of Drosophila melanogaster. Here we characterized the genome-wide effect of nuclear Piwi elimination on the presence of the heterochromatic H3K9me3 mark and HP1a, as well as on the transcription-associated mark H3K4me2. Our results demonstrate that a significant increase in the H3K4me2 level upon nuclear Piwi loss is not accompanied by the alterations in H3K9me3 and HP1a levels for several germline-expressed transposons, suggesting that in this case Piwi prevents transcription by a mechanism distinct from H3K9 methylation. We found that the targets of Piwi-dependent chromatin repression are mainly related to the elements that display a higher level of H3K4me2 modification in the absence of silencing, i.e. most actively transcribed elements. We also show that Piwi-guided silencing does not significantly influence the chromatin state of dual-strand piRNA-producing clusters. In addition, host protein-coding gene expression is essentially not affected due to the nuclear Piwi elimination, but we noted an increase in small nuclear spliceosomal RNAs abundance and propose Piwi involvement in their post-transcriptional regulation. Our work reveals new aspects of transposon silencing in Drosophila, indicating that transcription of transposons can underpin their Piwi dependent silencing, while canonical heterochromatin marks are not obligatory for their repression.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Eukaryotic and archaeal TBP and TFB/TF(II)B follow different promoter DNA bending pathways
    [Jun 2014]

    During transcription initiation, the promoter DNA is recognized and bent by the basal transcription factor TATA-binding protein (TBP). Subsequent association of transcription factor B (TFB) with the TBP–DNA complex is followed by the recruitment of the ribonucleic acid polymerase resulting in the formation of the pre-initiation complex. TBP and TFB/TF(II)B are highly conserved in structure and function among the eukaryotic-archaeal domain but intriguingly have to operate under vastly different conditions. Employing single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we monitored DNA bending by eukaryotic and archaeal TBPs in the absence and presence of TFB in real-time. We observed that the lifetime of the TBP–DNA interaction differs significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic system. We show that the eukaryotic DNA-TBP interaction is characterized by a linear, stepwise bending mechanism with an intermediate state distinguished by a distinct bending angle. TF(II)B specifically stabilizes the fully bent TBP–promoter DNA complex and we identify this step as a regulatory checkpoint. In contrast, the archaeal TBP–DNA interaction is extremely dynamic and TBP from the archaeal organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strictly requires TFB for DNA bending. Thus, we demonstrate that transcription initiation follows diverse pathways on the way to the formation of the pre-initiation complex.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The forkhead transcription factor FOXK2 acts as a chromatin targeting factor for the BAP1-containing histone deubiquitinase complex
    [Jun 2014]

    There are numerous forkhead transcription factors in mammalian cells but we know little about the molecular functions of the majority of these. FOXK2 is a ubiquitously expressed family member suggesting an important function across multiple cell types. Here, we show that FOXK2 binds to the SIN3A and PR-DUB complexes. The PR-DUB complex contains the important tumour suppressor protein, the deubiquitinase BAP1. FOXK2 recruits BAP1 to DNA, promotes local histone deubiquitination and causes changes in target gene activity. Our results therefore provide an important link between BAP1 and the transcription factor FOXK2 and demonstrate how BAP1 can be recruited to specific regulatory loci.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Evidence that TSC2 acts as a transcription factor and binds to and represses the promoter of Epiregulin
    [Jun 2014]

    The TSC2 gene, mutated in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), encodes a 200 kDa protein TSC2 (tuberin). The importance of TSC2 in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation is irrefutable. TSC2 in complex with TSC1 negatively regulates the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) via RHEB in the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway and in turn regulates cell proliferation. It shows nuclear as well as cytoplasmic localization. However, its nuclear function remains elusive. In order to identify the nuclear function of TSC2, a whole-genome expression profiling of TSC2 overexpressing cells was performed, and the results showed differential regulation of 266 genes. Interestingly, transcription was found to be the most populated functional category. EREG (Epiregulin), a member of the epidermal growth factor family, was found to be the most downregulated gene in the microarray analysis. Previous reports have documented elevated levels of EREG in TSC lesions, making its regulatory aspects intriguing. Using the luciferase reporter, ChIP and EMSA techniques, we show that TSC2 binds to the EREG promoter between –352 bp and –303 bp and negatively regulates its expression. This is the first evidence for the role of TSC2 as a transcription factor and of TSC2 binding to the promoter of any gene.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The ETS family member GABP{alpha} modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer
    [Jun 2014]

    In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Genome-wide characterization reveals complex interplay between TP53 and TP63 in response to genotoxic stress
    [Jun 2014]

    In response to genotoxic stress the TP53 tumour suppressor activates target gene expression to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis depending on the extent of DNA damage. These canonical activities can be repressed by TP63 in normal stratifying epithelia to maintain proliferative capacity or drive proliferation of squamous cell carcinomas, where TP63 is frequently overexpressed/amplified. Here we use ChIP-sequencing, integrated with microarray analysis, to define the genome-wide interplay between TP53 and TP63 in response to genotoxic stress in normal cells. We reveal that TP53 and TP63 bind to overlapping, but distinct cistromes of sites through utilization of distinctive consensus motifs and that TP53 is constitutively bound to a number of sites. We demonstrate that cisplatin and adriamycin elicit distinct effects on TP53 and TP63 binding events, through which TP53 can induce or repress transcription of an extensive network of genes by direct binding and/or modulation of TP63 activity. Collectively, this results in a global TP53-dependent repression of cell cycle progression, mitosis and DNA damage repair concomitant with activation of anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic canonical target genes. Further analyses reveal that in the absence of genotoxic stress TP63 plays an important role in maintaining expression of DNA repair genes, loss of which results in defective repair.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Histone H3 K79 methylation states play distinct roles in UV-induced sister chromatid exchange and cell cycle checkpoint arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    [Jun 2014]

    Histone post-translational modifications have been shown to contribute to DNA damage repair. Prior studies have suggested that specific H3K79 methylation states play distinct roles in the response to UV-induced DNA damage. To evaluate these observations, we examined the effect of altered H3K79 methylation patterns on UV-induced G1/S checkpoint response and sister chromatid exchange (SCE). We found that the di- and trimethylated states both contribute to activation of the G1/S checkpoint to varying degrees, depending on the synchronization method, although methylation is not required for checkpoint in response to high levels of UV damage. In contrast, UV-induced SCE is largely a product of the trimethylated state, which influences the usage of gene conversion versus popout mechanisms. Regulation of H3K79 methylation by H2BK123 ubiquitylation is important for both checkpoint function and SCE. H3K79 methylation is not required for the repair of double-stranded breaks caused by transient HO endonuclease expression, but does play a modest role in survival from continuous exposure. The overall results provide evidence for the participation of H3K79 methylation in UV-induced recombination repair and checkpoint activation, and further indicate that the di- and trimethylation states play distinct roles in these DNA damage response pathways.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Aberrant repair initiated by mismatch-specific thymine-DNA glycosylases provides a mechanism for the mutational bias observed in CpG islands
    [Jun 2014]

    The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiates the base excision repair (BER) pathway to remove spontaneous and induced DNA base damage. It was first biochemically characterized for its ability to remove T mispaired with G in CpG context. TDG is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expressions by protecting CpG-rich promoters from de novo DNA methylation. Here we demonstrate that TDG initiates aberrant repair by excising T when it is paired with a damaged adenine residue in DNA duplex. TDG targets the non-damaged DNA strand and efficiently excises T opposite of hypoxanthine (Hx), 1,N6-ethenoadenine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine and abasic site in TpG/CpX context, where X is a modified residue. In vitro reconstitution of BER with duplex DNA containing Hx•T pair and TDG results in incorporation of cytosine across Hx. Furthermore, analysis of the mutation spectra inferred from single nucleotide polymorphisms in human population revealed a highly biased mutation pattern within CpG islands (CGIs), with enhanced mutation rate at CpA and TpG sites. These findings demonstrate that under experimental conditions used TDG catalyzes sequence context-dependent aberrant removal of thymine, which results in TpG, CpA->CpG mutations, thus providing a plausible mechanism for the putative evolutionary origin of the CGIs in mammalian genomes.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Telomere length kinetics assay (TELKA) sorts the telomere length maintenance (tlm) mutants into functional groups
    [Jun 2014]

    Genome-wide systematic screens in yeast have uncovered a large gene network (the telomere length maintenance network or TLM), encompassing more than 400 genes, which acts coordinatively to maintain telomere length. Identifying the genes was an important first stage; the next challenge is to decipher their mechanism of action and to organize then into functional groups or pathways. Here we present a new telomere-length measuring program, TelQuant, and a novel assay, telomere length kinetics assay, and use them to organize tlm mutants into functional classes. Our results show that a mutant defective for the relatively unknown MET7 gene has the same telomeric kinetics as mutants defective for the ribonucleotide reductase subunit Rnr1, in charge of the limiting step in dNTP synthesis, or for the Ku heterodimer, a well-established telomere complex. We confirm the epistatic relationship between the mutants and show that physical interactions exist between Rnr1 and Met7. We also show that Met7 and the Ku heterodimer affect dNTP formation, and play a role in non-homologous end joining. Thus, our telomere kinetics assay uncovers new functional groups, as well as complex genetic interactions between tlm mutants.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Human single-stranded DNA binding protein 1 (hSSB1/NABP2) is required for the stability and repair of stalled replication forks
    [Jun 2014]

    Aberrant DNA replication is a primary cause of mutations that are associated with pathological disorders including cancer. During DNA metabolism, the primary causes of replication fork stalling include secondary DNA structures, highly transcribed regions and damaged DNA. The restart of stalled replication forks is critical for the timely progression of the cell cycle and ultimately for the maintenance of genomic stability. Our previous work has implicated the single-stranded DNA binding protein, hSSB1/NABP2, in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks via homologous recombination. Here, we demonstrate that hSSB1 relocates to hydroxyurea (HU)-damaged replication forks where it is required for ATR and Chk1 activation and recruitment of Mre11 and Rad51. Consequently, hSSB1-depleted cells fail to repair and restart stalled replication forks. hSSB1 deficiency causes accumulation of DNA strand breaks and results in chromosome aberrations observed in mitosis, ultimately resulting in hSSB1 being required for survival to HU and camptothecin. Overall, our findings demonstrate the importance of hSSB1 in maintaining and repairing DNA replication forks and for overall genomic stability.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Suicidal cross-linking of PARP-1 to AP site intermediates in cells undergoing base excision repair
    [Jun 2014]

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is an abundant nuclear enzyme in mammalian cells. The enzyme synthesizes polymers of ADP-ribose from the coenzyme NAD+ and plays multifaceted roles in cellular responses to genotoxic stress, including DNA repair. It had been shown that mouse fibroblasts treated with a DNA methylating agent in combination with a PARP inhibitor exhibit higher cytotoxicity than cells treated with methylating agent alone. This lethality of the PARP inhibitor is dependent on apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in the DNA and the presence of PARP-1. Here, we show that purified PARP-1 is capable of forming a DNA-protein cross-link (DPC) by covalently attaching to the AP site. This DPC formation is specific to the presence of the natural AP site in DNA and is accompanied by a single-strand DNA incision. Cellular studies confirm the formation of PARP-1 DPCs during alkylating agent-induced base excision repair (BER) and formation of DPCs is enhanced by a PARP inhibitor. Using an N-terminal and C-terminal truncated PARP-1 we show that a polypeptide fragment comprising the zinc 3 and BRCT sub-domains is sufficient for DPC formation. The covalent attachment of PARP-1 to AP site-containing DNA appears to be a suicidal event when BER is overwhelmed or disrupted.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • RAG2 mutants alter DSB repair pathway choice in vivo and illuminate the nature of 'alternative NHEJ'
    [Jun 2014]

    DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by several mechanisms, including classical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) and a poorly defined, error-prone process termed alternative NHEJ (a-NHEJ). How cells choose between these alternatives to join physiologic DSBs remains unknown. Here, we show that deletion of RAG2's C-terminus allows a-NHEJ to repair RAG-mediated DSBs in developing lymphocytes from both c-NHEJ-proficient and c-NHEJ-deficient mice, demonstrating that the V(D)J recombinase influences repair pathway choice in vivo. Analysis of V(D)J junctions revealed that, contrary to expectation, junctional characteristics alone do not reliably distinguish between a-NHEJ and c-NHEJ. These data suggest that a-NHEJ is not necessarily mutagenic, and may be more prevalent than previously appreciated. Whole genome sequencing of a lymphoma arising in a p53–/– mouse bearing a C-terminal RAG2 truncation reveals evidence of a-NHEJ and also of aberrant recognition of DNA sequences resembling RAG recognition sites.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • NuMA promotes homologous recombination repair by regulating the accumulation of the ISWI ATPase SNF2h at DNA breaks
    [Jun 2014]

    Chromatin remodeling factors play an active role in the DNA damage response by shaping chromatin to facilitate the repair process. The spatiotemporal regulation of these factors is key to their function, yet poorly understood. We report that the structural nuclear protein NuMA accumulates at sites of DNA damage in a poly[ADP-ribose]ylation-dependent manner and functionally interacts with the ISWI ATPase SNF2h/SMARCA5, a chromatin remodeler that facilitates DNA repair. NuMA coimmunoprecipitates with SNF2h, regulates its diffusion in the nucleoplasm and controls its accumulation at DNA breaks. Consistent with NuMA enabling SNF2h function, cells with silenced NuMA exhibit reduced chromatin decompaction after DNA cleavage, lesser focal recruitment of homologous recombination repair factors, impaired DNA double-strand break repair in chromosomal (but not in episomal) contexts and increased sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. These findings reveal a structural basis for the orchestration of chromatin remodeling whereby a scaffold protein promotes genome maintenance by directing a remodeler to DNA breaks.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Requirement for Parp-1 and DNA ligases 1 or 3 but not of Xrcc1 in chromosomal translocation formation by backup end joining
    [Jun 2014]

    In mammalian cells, ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired in all phases of the cell cycle predominantly by classical, DNA-PK-dependent nonhomologous end joining (D-NHEJ). Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is functional during the S- and G2-phases, when a sister chromatid becomes available. An error-prone, alternative form of end joining, operating as backup (B-NHEJ) functions robustly throughout the cell cycle and particularly in the G2-phase and is thought to backup predominantly D-NHEJ. Parp-1, DNA-ligases 1 (Lig1) and 3 (Lig3), and Xrcc1 are implicated in B-NHEJ. Chromosome and chromatid translocations are manifestations of erroneous DSB repair and are crucial culprits in malignant transformation and IR-induced cell lethality. We analyzed shifts in translocation formation deriving from defects in D-NHEJ or HRR in cells irradiated in the G2-phase and identify B-NHEJ as the main DSB repair pathway backing up both of these defects at the cost of a large increase in translocation formation. Our results identify Parp-1 and Lig1 and 3 as factors involved in translocation formation and show that Xrcc1 reinforces the function of Lig3 in the process without being required for it. Finally, we demonstrate intriguing connections between B-NHEJ and DNA end resection in translocation formation and show that, as for D-NHEJ and HRR, the function of B-NHEJ facilitates the recovery from the G2-checkpoint. These observations advance our understanding of chromosome aberration formation and have implications for the mechanism of action of Parp inhibitors.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Sumoylation of the Rad1 nuclease promotes DNA repair and regulates its DNA association
    [Jun 2014]

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad1-Rad10 complex is a conserved, structure-specific endonuclease important for repairing multiple types of DNA lesions. Upon recruitment to lesion sites, Rad1-Rad10 removes damaged sequences, enabling subsequent gap filling and ligation. Acting at mid-steps of repair, the association and dissociation of Rad1-Rad10 with DNA can influence repair efficiency. We show that genotoxin-enhanced Rad1 sumoylation occurs after the nuclease is recruited to lesion sites. A single lysine outside Rad1's nuclease and Rad10-binding domains is sumoylated in vivo and in vitro. Mutation of this site to arginine abolishes Rad1 sumoylation and impairs Rad1-mediated repair at high doses of DNA damage, but sustains the repair of a single double-stranded break. The timing of Rad1 sumoylation and the phenotype bias toward high lesion loads point to a post-incision role for sumoylation, possibly affecting Rad1 dissociation from DNA. Indeed, biochemical examination shows that sumoylation of Rad1 decreases the complex's affinity for DNA without affecting other protein properties. These findings suggest a model whereby sumoylation of Rad1 promotes its disengagement from DNA after nuclease cleavage, allowing it to efficiently attend to large numbers of DNA lesions.

    Categories: Journal Articles