Nucleic Acids Research

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  • Two ZNF509 (ZBTB49) isoforms induce cell-cycle arrest by activating transcription of p21/CDKN1A and RB upon exposure to genotoxic stress
    [Oct 2014]

    ZNF509 is unique among POK family proteins in that four isoforms are generated by alternative splicing. Short ZNF509 (ZNF509S1, -S2 and -S3) isoforms contain one or two out of the seven zinc-fingers contained in long ZNF509 (ZNF509L). Here, we investigated the functions of ZNF509 isoforms in response to DNA damage, showing isoforms to be induced by p53. Intriguingly, to inhibit proliferation of HCT116 and HEK293 cells, we found that ZNF509L activates p21/CDKN1A transcription, while ZNF509S1 induces RB. ZNF509L binds to the p21/CDKN1A promoter either alone or by interacting with MIZ-1 to recruit the co-activator p300 to activate p21/CDKN1A transcription. In contrast, ZNF509S1 binds to the distal RB promoter to interact and interfere with the MIZF repressor, resulting in derepression and transcription of RB. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ZNF509 is highly expressed in normal epithelial cells, but was completely repressed in tumor tissues of the colon, lung and skin, indicating a possible role as a tumor suppressor.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Silkworm HP1a transcriptionally enhances highly expressed euchromatic genes via association with their transcription start sites
    [Oct 2014]

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is an evolutionarily conserved protein across different eukaryotic species and is crucial for heterochromatin establishment and maintenance. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, encodes two HP1 proteins, BmHP1a and BmHP1b. In order to investigate the role of BmHP1a in transcriptional regulation, we performed genome-wide analyses of the transcriptome, transcription start sites (TSSs), chromatin modification states and BmHP1a-binding sites of the silkworm ovary-derived BmN4 cell line. We identified a number of BmHP1a-binding loci throughout the silkworm genome and found that these loci included TSSs and frequently co-occurred with neighboring euchromatic histone modifications. In addition, we observed that genes with BmHP1a-associated TSSs were relatively highly expressed in BmN4 cells. RNA interference-mediated BmHP1a depletion resulted in the transcriptional repression of highly expressed genes with BmHP1a-associated TSSs, whereas genes not coupled with BmHP1a-binding regions were less affected by the treatment. These results demonstrate that BmHP1a binds near TSSs of highly expressed euchromatic genes and positively regulates their expression. Our study revealed a novel mode of transcriptional regulation mediated by HP1 proteins.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Molecular mechanisms of two-component system RhpRS regulating type III secretion system in Pseudomonas syringae
    [Oct 2014]

    Pseudomonas syringae uses the two-component system RhpRS to regulate the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS) genes and bacterial virulence. However, the molecular mechanisms and the regulons of RhpRS have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that RhpS functions as a kinase and a phosphatase on RhpR and as an autokinase upon itself. RhpR is phosphorylated by the small phosphodonor acetyl phosphate. A specific RhpR-binding site containing the inverted repeat (IR) motif GTATC-N6-GATAC, was mapped to its own promoter by a DNase I footprint analysis. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that P-RhpR has a higher binding affinity to the IR motif than RhpR. To identify additional RhpR targets in P. syringae, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) and detected 167 enriched loci including the hrpR promoter, suggesting the direct regulation of T3SS cascade genes by RhpR. A genome-wide microarray analysis showed that, in addition to the T3SS cascade genes, RhpR differentially regulates a large set of genes with various functions in response to different growth conditions. Together, these results suggested that RhpRS is a global regulator that allows P. syringae to sense and respond to environmental changes by coordinating T3SS expression and many other biological processes.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • BRCA1 modulates the autophosphorylation status of DNA-PKcs in S phase of the cell cycle
    [Oct 2014]

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are the two prominent pathways responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEJ is not restricted to a cell-cycle stage, whereas HR is active primarily in the S/G2 phases suggesting there are cell cycle-specific mechanisms that play a role in the choice between NHEJ and HR. Here we show NHEJ is attenuated in S phase via modulation of the autophosphorylation status of the NHEJ factor DNA-PKcs at serine 2056 by the pro-HR factor BRCA1. BRCA1 interacts with DNA-PKcs in a cell cycle-regulated manner and this interaction is mediated by the tandem BRCT domain of BRCA1, but surprisingly in a phospho-independent manner. BRCA1 attenuates DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation via directly blocking the ability of DNA-PKcs to autophosphorylate. Subsequently, blocking autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at the serine 2056 phosphorylation cluster promotes HR-required DNA end processing and loading of HR factors to DSBs and is a possible mechanism by which BRCA1 promotes HR.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Replication of alpha-satellite DNA arrays in endogenous human centromeric regions and in human artificial chromosome
    [Oct 2014]

    In human chromosomes, centromeric regions comprise megabase-size arrays of 171 bp alpha-satellite DNA monomers. The large distances spanned by these arrays preclude their replication from external sites and imply that the repetitive monomers contain replication origins. However, replication within these arrays has not previously been profiled and the role of alpha-satellite DNA in initiation of DNA replication has not yet been demonstrated. Here, replication of alpha-satellite DNA in endogenous human centromeric regions and in de novo formed Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) was analyzed. We showed that alpha-satellite monomers could function as origins of DNA replication and that replication of alphoid arrays organized into centrochromatin occurred earlier than those organized into heterochromatin. The distribution of inter-origin distances within centromeric alphoid arrays was comparable to the distribution of inter-origin distances on randomly selected non-centromeric chromosomal regions. Depletion of CENP-B, a kinetochore protein that binds directly to a 17 bp CENP-B box motif common to alpha-satellite DNA, resulted in enrichment of alpha-satellite sequences for proteins of the ORC complex, suggesting that CENP-B may have a role in regulating the replication of centromeric regions. Mapping of replication initiation sites in the HAC revealed that replication preferentially initiated in transcriptionally active regions.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • A gemcitabine sensitivity screen identifies a role for NEK9 in the replication stress response
    [Oct 2014]

    The Replication Stress Response (RSR) is a signaling network that recognizes challenges to DNA replication and coordinates diverse DNA repair and cell-cycle checkpoint pathways. Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analogue that causes cytotoxicity by inducing DNA replication blocks. Using a synthetic lethal screen of a RNAi library of nuclear enzymes to identify genes that when silenced cause gemcitabine sensitization or resistance in human triple-negative breast cancer cells, we identified NIMA (never in mitosis gene A)-related kinase 9 (NEK9) as a key component of the RSR. NEK9 depletion in cells leads to replication stress hypersensitivity, spontaneous accumulation of DNA damage and RPA70 foci, and an impairment in recovery from replication arrest. NEK9 protein levels also increase in response to replication stress. NEK9 complexes with CHK1, and moreover, NEK9 depletion impairs CHK1 autophosphorylation and kinase activity in response to replication stress. Thus, NEK9 is a critical component of the RSR that promotes CHK1 activity, maintaining genome integrity following challenges to DNA replication.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • RecQ-core of BLM unfolds telomeric G-quadruplex in the absence of ATP
    [Oct 2014]

    Various helicases and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins are known to destabilize G-quadruplex (GQ) structures, which otherwise result in genomic instability. Bulk biochemical studies have shown that Bloom helicase (BLM) unfolds both intermolecular and intramolecular GQ in the presence of ATP. Using single molecule FRET, we show that binding of RecQ-core of BLM (will be referred to as BLM) to ssDNA in the vicinity of an intramolecular GQ leads to destabilization and unfolding of the GQ in the absence of ATP. We show that the efficiency of BLM-mediated GQ unfolding correlates with the binding stability of BLM to ssDNA overhang, as modulated by the nucleotide state, ionic conditions, overhang length and overhang directionality. In particular, we observed enhanced GQ unfolding by BLM in the presence of non-hydrolysable ATP analogs, which has implications for the underlying mechanism. We also show that increasing GQ stability, via shorter loops or higher ionic strength, reduces BLM-mediated GQ unfolding. Finally, we show that while WRN has similar activity as BLM, RecQ and RECQ5 helicases do not unfold GQ in the absence of ATP at physiological ionic strength. In summary, our study points to a novel and potentially very common mechanism of GQ destabilization mediated by proteins binding to the vicinity of these structures.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Replication stress by Py-Im polyamides induces a non-canonical ATR-dependent checkpoint response
    [Oct 2014]

    Pyrrole–imidazole polyamides targeted to the androgen response element were cytotoxic in multiple cell lines, independent of intact androgen receptor signaling. Polyamide treatment induced accumulation of S-phase cells and of PCNA replication/repair foci. Activation of a cell cycle checkpoint response was evidenced by autophosphorylation of ATR, the S-phase checkpoint kinase, and by recruitment of ATR and the ATR activators RPA, 9-1-1, and Rad17 to chromatin. Surprisingly, ATR activation was accompanied by only a slight increase in single-stranded DNA, and the ATR targets RPA2 and Chk1, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase, were not phosphorylated. However, ATR activation resulted in phosphorylation of the replicative helicase subunit MCM2, an ATR effector. Polyamide treatment also induced accumulation of monoubiquitinated FANCD2, which is recruited to stalled replication forks and interacts transiently with phospho-MCM2. This suggests that polyamides induce replication stress that ATR can counteract independently of Chk1 and that the FA/BRCA pathway may also be involved in the response to polyamides. In biochemical assays, polyamides inhibit DNA helicases, providing a plausible mechanism for S-phase inhibition.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • FBXL5-mediated degradation of single-stranded DNA-binding protein hSSB1 controls DNA damage response
    [Oct 2014]

    Human single-strand (ss) DNA binding proteins 1 (hSSB1) has been shown to participate in DNA damage response and maintenance of genome stability by regulating the initiation of ATM-dependent signaling. ATM phosphorylates hSSB1 and prevents hSSB1 from ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. However, the E3 ligase that targets hSSB1 for destruction is still unknown. Here, we report that hSSB1 is the bona fide substrate for an Fbxl5-containing SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box) E3 ligase. Fbxl5 interacts with and targets hSSB1 for ubiquitination and degradation, which could be prevented by ATM-mediated hSSB1 T117 phosphorylation. Furthermore, cells overexpression of Fbxl5 abrogated the cellular response to DSBs, including activation of ATM and phosphorylation of ATM targets and exhibited increased radiosensitivity, chemosensitivity and defective checkpoint activation after genotoxic stress stimuli. Moreover, the protein levels of hSSB1 and Fbxl5 showed an inverse correlation in lung cancer cells lines and clinical lung cancer samples. Therefore, Fbxl5 may negatively modulate hSSB1 to regulate DNA damage response, implicating Fbxl5 as a novel, promising therapeutic target for lung cancers.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Human germline and pan-cancer variomes and their distinct functional profiles
    [Oct 2014]

    Identification of non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) has exponentially increased due to advances in Next-Generation Sequencing technologies. The functional impacts of these variations have been difficult to ascertain because the corresponding knowledge about sequence functional sites is quite fragmented. It is clear that mapping of variations to sequence functional features can help us better understand the pathophysiological role of variations. In this study, we investigated the effect of nsSNVs on more than 17 common types of post-translational modification (PTM) sites, active sites and binding sites. Out of 1 705 285 distinct nsSNVs on 259 216 functional sites we identified 38 549 variations that significantly affect 10 major functional sites. Furthermore, we found distinct patterns of site disruptions due to germline and somatic nsSNVs. Pan-cancer analysis across 12 different cancer types led to the identification of 51 genes with 106 nsSNV affected functional sites found in 3 or more cancer types. 13 of the 51 genes overlap with previously identified Significantly Mutated Genes (Nature. 2013 Oct 17;502(7471)). 62 mutations in these 13 genes affecting functional sites such as DNA, ATP binding and various PTM sites occur across several cancers and can be prioritized for additional validation and investigations.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Non-metastatic 2 (NME2)-mediated suppression of lung cancer metastasis involves transcriptional regulation of key cell adhesion factor vinculin
    [Oct 2014]

    Tumor metastasis refers to spread of a tumor from site of its origin to distant organs and causes majority of cancer deaths. Although >30 metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that negatively regulate metastasis have been identified so far, two issues are poorly understood: first, which MSGs oppose metastasis in a tumor type, and second, which molecular function of MSG controls metastasis. Herein, integrative analyses of tumor-transcriptomes (n = 382), survival data (n = 530) and lymph node metastases (n = 100) in lung cancer patients identified non-metastatic 2 (NME2) as a key MSG from a pool of >30 metastasis suppressors. Subsequently, we generated a promoter-wide binding map for NME2 using chromatin immunoprecipitation with promoter microarrays (ChIP-chip), and transcriptome profiling. We discovered novel targets of NME2 which are involved in focal adhesion signaling. Importantly, we detected binding of NME2 in promoter of focal adhesion factor, vinculin. Reduced expression of NME2 led to enhanced transcription of vinculin. In comparison, NME1, a close homolog of NME2, did not bind to vinculin promoter nor regulate its expression. In line, enhanced metastasis of NME2-depleted lung cancer cells was found in zebrafish and nude mice tumor models. The metastatic potential of NME2-depleted cells was remarkably diminished upon selective RNA-i-mediated silencing of vinculin. Together, we demonstrate that reduced NME2 levels lead to transcriptional de-repression of vinculin and regulate lung cancer metastasis.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The RIG-I ATPase core has evolved a functional requirement for allosteric stabilization by the Pincer domain
    [Oct 2014]

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a pattern recognition receptor expressed in metazoan cells that is responsible for eliciting the production of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines upon detection of intracellular, non-self RNA. Structural studies of RIG-I have identified a novel Pincer domain composed of two alpha helices that physically tethers the C-terminal domain to the SF2 helicase core. We find that the Pincer plays an important role in mediating the enzymatic and signaling activities of RIG-I. We identify a series of mutations that additively decouple the Pincer motif from the ATPase core and show that this decoupling results in impaired signaling. Through enzymological and biophysical analysis, we further show that the Pincer domain controls coupled enzymatic activity of the protein through allosteric control of the ATPase core. Further, we show that select regions of the HEL1 domain have evolved to potentiate interactions with the Pincer domain, resulting in an adapted ATPase cleft that is now responsive to adjacent domains that selectively bind viral RNA.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Selective recognition of parallel and anti-parallel thrombin-binding aptamer G-quadruplexes by different fluorescent dyes
    [Oct 2014]

    G-quadruplexes (G4) have been found increasing potential in applications, such as molecular therapeutics, diagnostics and sensing. Both Thioflavin T (ThT) and N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) become fluorescent in the presence of most G4, but thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) has been reported as the only exception of the known G4-forming oligonucleotides when ThT is used as a high-throughput assay to identify G4 formation. Here, we investigate the interactions between ThT/NMM and TBA through fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular docking simulation experiments in the absence or presence of cations. The results display that a large ThT fluorescence enhancement can be observed only when ThT bind to the parallel TBA quadruplex, which is induced to form by ThT in the absence of cations. On the other hand, great promotion in NMM fluorescence can be obtained only in the presence of anti-parallel TBA quadruplex, which is induced to fold by K+ or thrombin. The highly selective recognition of TBA quadruplex with different topologies by the two probes may be useful to investigate the interactions between conformation-specific G4 and the associated proteins, and could also be applied in label-free fluorescent sensing of other biomolecules.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases GLD-2 and GLD-4 promote general gene expression via distinct mechanisms
    [Oct 2014]

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation mechanisms decide on cellular mRNA activities. Essential gatekeepers of post-transcriptional mRNA regulation are broadly conserved mRNA-modifying enzymes, such as cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases (cytoPAPs). Although these non-canonical nucleotidyltransferases efficiently elongate mRNA poly(A) tails in artificial tethering assays, we still know little about their global impact on poly(A) metabolism and their individual molecular roles in promoting protein production in organisms. Here, we use the animal model Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the global mechanisms of two germline-enriched cytoPAPs, GLD-2 and GLD-4, by combining polysome profiling with RNA sequencing. Our analyses suggest that GLD-2 activity mediates mRNA stability of many translationally repressed mRNAs. This correlates with a general shortening of long poly(A) tails in gld-2-compromised animals, suggesting that most if not all targets are stabilized via robust GLD-2-mediated polyadenylation. By contrast, only mild polyadenylation defects are found in gld-4-compromised animals and few mRNAs change in abundance. Interestingly, we detect a reduced number of polysomes in gld-4 mutants and GLD-4 protein co-sediments with polysomes, which together suggest that GLD-4 might stimulate or maintain translation directly. Our combined data show that distinct cytoPAPs employ different RNA-regulatory mechanisms to promote gene expression, offering new insights into translational activation of mRNAs.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Strong DNA deformation required for extremely slow DNA threading intercalation by a binuclear ruthenium complex
    [Oct 2014]

    DNA intercalation by threading is expected to yield high affinity and slow dissociation, properties desirable for DNA-targeted therapeutics. To measure these properties, we utilize single molecule DNA stretching to quantify both the binding affinity and the force-dependent threading intercalation kinetics of the binuclear ruthenium complex ,-[μ-bidppz-(phen)4Ru2]4+ (,-P). We measure the DNA elongation at a range of constant stretching forces using optical tweezers, allowing direct characterization of the intercalation kinetics as well as the amount intercalated at equilibrium. Higher forces exponentially facilitate the intercalative binding, leading to a profound decrease in the binding site size that results in one ligand intercalated at almost every DNA base stack. The zero force ,-P intercalation Kd is 44 nM, 25-fold stronger than the analogous mono-nuclear ligand (-P). The force-dependent kinetics analysis reveals a mechanism that requires DNA elongation of 0.33 nm for association, relaxation to an equilibrium elongation of 0.19 nm, and an additional elongation of 0.14 nm from the equilibrium state for dissociation. In cells, a molecule with binding properties similar to ,-P may rapidly bind DNA destabilized by enzymes during replication or transcription, but upon enzyme dissociation it is predicted to remain intercalated for several hours, thereby interfering with essential biological processes.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • The methyltransferase domain of dengue virus protein NS5 ensures efficient RNA synthesis initiation and elongation by the polymerase domain
    [Oct 2014]

    Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) responsible for the replication of single-strand RNA virus genomes exert their function in the context of complex replication machineries. Within these replication complexes the polymerase activity is often highly regulated by RNA elements, proteins or other domains of multi-domain polymerases. Here, we present data of the influence of the methyltransferase domain (NS5-MTase) of dengue virus (DENV) protein NS5 on the RdRp activity of the polymerase domain (NS5-Pol). The steady-state polymerase activities of DENV-2 recombinant NS5 and NS5-Pol are compared using different biochemical assays allowing the dissection of the de novo initiation, transition and elongation steps of RNA synthesis. We show that NS5-MTase ensures efficient RdRp activity by stimulating the de novo initiation and the elongation phase. This stimulation is related to a higher affinity of NS5 toward the single-strand RNA template indicating NS5-MTase either completes a high-affinity RNA binding site and/or promotes the correct formation of the template tunnel. Furthermore, the NS5-MTase increases the affinity of the priming nucleotide ATP upon de novo initiation and causes a higher catalytic efficiency of the polymerase upon elongation. The complex stimulation pattern is discussed under the perspective that NS5 adopts several conformations during RNA synthesis.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Single-molecule analysis uncovers the difference between the kinetics of DNA decatenation by bacterial topoisomerases I and III
    [Oct 2014]

    Escherichia coli topoisomerases I and III can decatenate double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules containing single-stranded DNA regions or nicks as well as relax negatively supercoiled DNA. Although the proteins share a mechanism of action and have similar structures, they participate in different cellular processes. Whereas topoisomerase III is a more efficient decatenase than topoisomerase I, the opposite is true for DNA relaxation. In order to investigate the differences in the mechanism of these two prototypical type IA topoisomerases, we studied DNA decatenation at the single-molecule level using braids of intact dsDNA and nicked dsDNA with bulges. We found that neither protein decatenates an intact DNA braid. In contrast, both enzymes exhibited robust decatenation activity on DNA braids with a bulge. The experiments reveal that a main difference between the unbraiding mechanisms of these topoisomerases lies in the pauses between decatenation cycles. Shorter pauses for topoisomerase III result in a higher decatenation rate. In addition, topoisomerase III shows a strong dependence on the crossover angle of the DNA strands. These real-time observations reveal the kinetic characteristics of the decatenation mechanism and help explain the differences between their activities.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Monomeric nature of dengue virus NS3 helicase and thermodynamic analysis of the interaction with single-stranded RNA
    [Oct 2014]

    Dengue virus nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein formed by a superfamily-2 RNA helicase linked to a protease domain. In this work, we report results from in vitro experiments designed to determine the oligomeric state of dengue virus NS3 helicase (NS3h) and to characterize fundamental properties of the interaction with single-stranded (ss)RNA. Pulsed field gradient-NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the effective hydrodynamic radius of NS3h, which was constant over a wide range of protein concentrations in the absence and presence of ssRNA. Size exclusion chromatography-static light scattering experiments showed that NS3h eluted as a monomeric molecule even in the presence of ssRNA. Binding of NS3h to ssRNA was studied by quantitative fluorescence titrations using fluorescein-labeled and unlabeled ssRNA oligonucleotides of different lengths, and the effect of the fluorescein label on the interaction parameters was also analyzed. Experimental results were well described by a statistical thermodynamic model based on the theory of non-specific interactions of large ligands to a one-dimensional lattice. We found that binding of NS3h to ssRNA oligonucleotides and to poly(A) is characterized by minimum and occluded binding site sizes both of 10 nucleotides and by a weak positive cooperativity between adjacent proteins.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Mechanism of allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase revealed by single-molecule and ensemble fluorescence
    [Oct 2014]

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) are routinely used to treat HIV-1 infection, yet their mechanism of action remains unclear despite intensive investigation. In this study, we developed complementary single-molecule fluorescence and ensemble fluorescence anisotropy approaches to discover how NNRTIs modulate the intra-molecular conformational changes and inter-molecular dynamics of RT-template/primer (T/P) and RT–T/P–dNTP complexes. We found that NNRTI binding to RT induces opening of the fingers and thumb subdomains, which increases the dynamic sliding motion of the enzyme on the T/P and reduces dNTP binding affinity. Further, efavirenz promotes formation of the E138-K101 salt bridge between the p51 and p66 subunits of RT, which contributes to opening of the thumb/fingers subdomains. Engineering a more polar salt bridge between p51 and p66 resulted in even greater increases in the thumb/fingers opening, RT sliding, dNTP binding disruption and in vitro and in vivo RT inhibition than were observed with wild-type RT. We also observed that K103N, a clinically relevant NNRTI resistance mutation, does not prevent binding between efavirenz and RT-T/P but instead allows formation of a stable and productive RT–T/P–dNTP complex, possibly through disruption of the E138-K101 salt bridge. Collectively, these data describe unique structure–activity–resistance relationships that could be exploited for drug development.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Dynamics of RNA modification by a multi-site-specific tRNA methyltransferase
    [Oct 2014]

    In most organisms, the widely conserved 1-methyl-adenosine58 (m1A58) tRNA modification is catalyzed by an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent, site-specific enzyme TrmI. In archaea, TrmI also methylates the adjacent adenine 57, m1A57 being an obligatory intermediate of 1-methyl-inosine57 formation. To study this multi-site specificity, we used three oligoribonucleotide substrates of Pyrococcus abyssi TrmI (PabTrmI) containing a fluorescent 2-aminopurine (2-AP) at the two target positions and followed the RNA binding kinetics and methylation reactions by stopped-flow and mass spectrometry. PabTrmI did not modify 2-AP but methylated the adjacent target adenine. 2-AP seriously impaired the methylation of A57 but not A58, confirming that PabTrmI methylates efficiently the first adenine of the A57A58A59 sequence. PabTrmI binding provoked a rapid increase of fluorescence, attributed to base unstacking in the environment of 2-AP. Then, a slow decrease was observed only with 2-AP at position 57 and SAM, suggesting that m1A58 formation triggers RNA release. A model of the protein–tRNA complex shows both target adenines in proximity of SAM and emphasizes no major tRNA conformational change except base flipping during the reaction. The solvent accessibility of the SAM pocket is not affected by the tRNA, thereby enabling S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine to be replaced by SAM without prior release of monomethylated tRNA.

    Categories: Journal Articles