Nature

Nature is the international weekly journal of science: a magazine style journal that publishes full-length research papers in all disciplines of science, as well as News and Views, reviews, news, features, commentaries, web focuses and more, covering all branches of science and how science impacts upon all aspects of society and life.
  • Don’t feed the trolls
    [Jun 2014]

    Don’t feed the trolls

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510007a

    Patent abuse slows down research and innovation, and must be confronted. Delays to US legislation are not reassuring, but there has been some progress in the courts.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Renewed energy
    [Jun 2014]

    Renewed energy

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510007b

    Reforms at the US Department of Energy are recharging research.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Integrity mentors
    [Jun 2014]

    Integrity mentors

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510008a

    Policies in Ireland and China make Nature’s 2014 mentoring awards timely.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Palaeontology: Nectar feast in fossil belly
    [Jun 2014]

    Palaeontology: Nectar feast in fossil belly

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510010a

    A 47-million-year-old fossil bird with pollen grains in its belly is the first direct evidence of nectar-feeding in birds.Gerald Mayr and Volker Wilde at the Senckenberg Research Institute in Frankfurt, Germany, analysed the fossil of a small bird, Pumiliornis tessellatus (pictured), which is

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Cancer: Tumour reined in by its neighbours
    [Jun 2014]

    Cancer: Tumour reined in by its neighbours

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510010b

    Two groups have found that certain non-cancerous cells that surround a tumour in the pancreas keep it in check, even though these cells seem to boost other types of cancer.Raghu Kalluri at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and his

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Immunology: Fetal cells have a good memory
    [Jun 2014]

    Immunology: Fetal cells have a good memory

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510010c

    Immune cells that 'remember' past encounters with foreign molecules have been found in human umbilical cord blood, even though the fetal environment is presumed to be sterile.Human T cells begin to form when the fetus is about ten weeks old, but the cells were

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Particle physics: Antimatter passes charge test
    [Jun 2014]

    Particle physics: Antimatter passes charge test

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510010d

    Physicists have tightened the limits on the possible charge of an atom of antihydrogen.The neutral charge on many atoms and molecules has been measured with extremely high precision. The standard model of physics says that hydrogen's antimatter counterpart should have an opposite charge and

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Biogeography: Ancient coral reefs protected fish
    [Jun 2014]

    Biogeography: Ancient coral reefs protected fish

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510010e

    As the climate fluctuated over the past 3 million years, stable coral reefs provided a safe haven for tropical fish species, leading to the vast diversity of reef fishes seen today.David Mouillot at Montpellier University in France and his colleagues used sediment cores to

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Geology: First crust looked like Iceland
    [Jun 2014]

    Geology: First crust looked like Iceland

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510011a

    Ancient rocks from Canada suggest that Earth's first land was made billions of years ago in the same way as Iceland.Geologists think that continental crust first formed as magma broke through the dense ocean crust and crystallized on top. Iceland is considered to be

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Neuroprosthetics: Brain signals move paralysed hand
    [Jun 2014]

    Neuroprosthetics: Brain signals move paralysed hand

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510011b

    Paralysed monkeys were able to move their hands after researchers rerouted brain signals into the animals' spinal cord.Jonas Zimmermann and Andrew Jackson at Newcastle University, UK, implanted recording electrodes in the premotor cortex area of the brains of two monkeys and stimulating electrodes in

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Atmospheric science: Climate concerns from refrigerants
    [Jun 2014]

    Atmospheric science: Climate concerns from refrigerants

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510011c

    Chemicals that are slowly escaping from refrigerators and air conditioners are a greater threat to the climate than previously thought.Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are refrigerants that are replacing banned ozone-depleting chemicals. But HFCs are also greenhouse gases, and the amount of these chemicals stored in refrigeration

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Climate change: Fading winter fog threatens crops
    [Jun 2014]

    Climate change: Fading winter fog threatens crops

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510011d

    Climate change has reduced the amount of winter fog in California (pictured), possibly damaging the region's fruit and nut crops.Much of the fruit and nut production in the United States comes from the Central Valley of California. Dennis Baldocchi and Eric Waller

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Winner takes all in science
    [Jun 2014]

    Winner takes all in science

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510011e

    Author: Chris Woolston

    Nature's roundup of the papers and issues gaining traction on social media.As competition grows among researchers for ever-shrinking science budgets, articles about inequalities in funding and new ways to finance labs have recently drawn a lot of clicks and comments.Many researchers on

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Seven days: 30 May–5 June 2014
    [Jun 2014]

    Seven days: 30 May–5 June 2014

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/510012a

    The week in science: US proposes cleaning up power plants; retraction agreed in stem-cell controversy; and new statistics on the global rise in obesity.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Land models put to climate test
    [Jun 2014]

    Land models put to climate test

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/510016a

    Author: Jane Qiu

    Study under way on Mongolian steppes aims to improve knowledge of warming effects on vegetation.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Federal boost for German science
    [Jun 2014]

    Federal boost for German science

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/510019a

    Author: Quirin Schiermeier

    Agreement on changes to constitution pave way for university funding shake-up.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Solar energy: Springtime for the artificial leaf
    [Jun 2014]

    Solar energy: Springtime for the artificial leaf

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/510022a

    Author: Jessica Marshall

    Researchers make headway in turning photons into fuel.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Alzheimer's disease: The forgetting gene
    [Jun 2014]

    Alzheimer's disease: The forgetting gene

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/510026a

    Author: Laura Spinney

    For decades, most researchers ignored the leading genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. That is set to change.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Environment: Accelerate research on land creation
    [Jun 2014]

    Environment: Accelerate research on land creation

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510029a

    Authors: Peiyue Li, Hui Qian & Jianhua Wu

    China's campaign to bulldoze mountains to build cities needs expertise to avert geoengineering problems, warn Peiyue Li, Hui Qian and Jianhua Wu.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Molecular biology: Of DNA and broken dreams
    [Jun 2014]

    Molecular biology: Of DNA and broken dreams

    Nature 510, 7503 (2014). doi:10.1038/510032a

    Author: Georgina Ferry

    Georgina Ferry weighs up a life of William Astbury, who had a forgotten role in pinning down the double helix.

    Categories: Journal Articles